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Vision Kodak 7277 - 320T: What to do?


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#1 Frank Burgo

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 10:01 AM

not quite sure if this is the right forum for it,

but anyways, our lecturer gave us an assessment where he gave as a roll of film to shoot anything with it (we get assess on what we shoot and how well its shot). Anyways I ended up with a roll of 7277, a stock which I wasn?t familiar with, and upon some googling on the stock I found out that the stock was some what old & obsolete and that I have to over expose it by a stop or something to compensate for its age

anyways, my point is, i don't know this stock and i'm not used to shooting with old stock, and i was just wondering if someone could advice me on how best to make this stock work and what kind of shooting conditions would be best suited to this stock in its current condition

thanks alot in advance
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 11:53 AM

it's kind of a vague question; like asking what to do with left-overs almost. . .
A clip test from a lab will tell you how badly fogged the film is; though over-exposure is going to probably be required, just a question of how much. 320 is a pretty nice speed all in all; so even over-exposing it to get past the fog level shouldn't be too far outside of the realm of possibility (hell, i recall getting a T2 on a subway platform rated @ 80asa, and was very surprised!).
You could also perhaps shoot with the fog, rating at 320 if you create a concept "worthy" of such a "look."


The best shooting conditions would be having all the light/power/time in the world to make your film. . . but that's not really possible, and without knowing more specifically your situation I don't think anyone on here can offer more than just generalities for advice.
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#3 John Holland

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 12:01 PM

5277/7277 was a really nice low contrast stock compared to other Kodak stocks of the time it was introduced to compete with Agfa XT 320 So much so in the US where most stock is sold it put Agfa out of business.
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#4 Frank Burgo

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:58 PM

it's kind of a vague question; like asking what to do with left-overs almost. . .
A clip test from a lab will tell you how badly fogged the film is; though over-exposure is going to probably be required, just a question of how much. 320 is a pretty nice speed all in all; so even over-exposing it to get past the fog level shouldn't be too far outside of the realm of possibility (hell, i recall getting a T2 on a subway platform rated @ 80asa, and was very surprised!).
You could also perhaps shoot with the fog, rating at 320 if you create a concept "worthy" of such a "look."


The best shooting conditions would be having all the light/power/time in the world to make your film. . . but that's not really possible, and without knowing more specifically your situation I don't think anyone on here can offer more than just generalities for advice.

yeah i realise its a bit vague, but theres no harm in asking
anyways i don't have the luxury of testing the film (although i could get my friend to develop it in her photo lab, is that possible, would those chemicals mix?), but it is brand new in the sense that it hasn't been open and has been kept in a fridge, the only number on it that corresponds to a date is "2004", but i'm hoping that it means the sticker was made in 2004 not the film itself. So keeping in my mind the possible age of the film in ur opinion what should i rate the film or how much to over-expose it to get a natural look

also as a general question, when i said best shooting condition, i mean what condition is best suited to this film, like u'd use 500 for low light, 50 for sunny days or 200 for normal conditions, where does 320 fit into the pack, i mean obviously u could use any stock any time of the day if u wanted, but generally speaking why would someone pick 320 and for what conditions would they pick it for (i could probably answer myself but i prefer to hear it from someone who's more experienced than me)
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 02:05 PM

320 is pretty high speed all in all (it's what i normally rate 500T @ for low light) so I'd say it's for when things are dim. That being the case, I'd say over expose by about a stop or so, and hope. without a clip test to know how badly the film is fogged you really haven't, as far as I know got a better option. I don't believe any still chemicals will mix for motion picture stock; as even the 320 should still be an ENC developer (as opposed to C41 for still film in color or e6 for reversal). Also, take the #s and maybe give kodak a ring, they should be able to tell you manufacturing date.
Even storage in a fridge is not a long-term solution to prevent fogging. it helps, but only deep freeze really allows for long -term storage and with a fast stock like a 320, I'd be a little concerned.
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