Jump to content


Photo

Kodak 250D 5205


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Ashley Barron

Ashley Barron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 March 2008 - 03:38 PM

Hi,
Has anyone here worked with Kodak 250D 5205 stock (particularly under Tungsten lights)? If so, has anyone got any tips on working with it?
Thank you!
  • 0

#2 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 March 2008 - 05:25 PM

If your primary source is daylight, with tungsten mixed in (such as would typically be found in an indoor daylight situation) the mix of light is handled surprisingly well by this stock. A decent colorist can get good results with this scenario, even without putting any gel on the lighting. If this describes your planned shoot, you should be fine. However, from the wording of your question, I'm not sure if you're asking about a 100% tungsten situation, in which case I'd recommend a tungsten stock.
  • 0

#3 Ashley Barron

Ashley Barron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 March 2008 - 09:26 AM

It's a fully tungsten shoot, however I am getting a color correction filter. Is this fine?
  • 0

#4 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4164 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:28 AM

It's a fully tungsten shoot, however I am getting a color correction filter. Is this fine?


An 80A filter? You would lose two stops of light which I think would put you about 62ASA. Maybe about 40ASA if you want to tighten up the grain a bit! Pile on the footcandles! ;) Certainly if it's as cold where you are, as it is here in the U.K. then this might be the right time to shoot this mindyou.

Could you not use daylight balanced flo's or something?

love

Freya
  • 0

#5 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2273 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:24 PM

If its a tungsten shoot why are using daylight stock ? . If its some cheap /free stock and you have no option do not stick a filter 80A over the lens just much to much loss of speed . you will have to use full CTB gells on your lights.
  • 0

#6 Joshua Reis

Joshua Reis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 108 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 April 2008 - 03:32 AM

Hi, what visual / aesthetic style are you going for? 5205 is a very versatile, low grain, and low contrast film-stock. Will you be shooting for a contact print, telecine, or film scan? I think it all depends on what you want your film to look like. Sure you could shoot with an 80A filter. Its probably not the most practical solution, but I'm sure it can be done. Shoot with 80A and push 1 development for a 1 stop in exposure compensation? You could shoot with half correction? Or you could even shoot without any color correction filters and completely time out the color shift in telecine or the DI. Gelling the lights is another option, but again that probably wouldn't serve to be too practical depending on the scope and size of your lighting setup. There really isn't a perfect answer. If you have the opportunity, do a number of tests simulating different scenarios. Discover what appeals to you the most. Best of luck

Joshua

Hi,
Has anyone here worked with Kodak 250D 5205 stock (particularly under Tungsten lights)? If so, has anyone got any tips on working with it?
Thank you!


  • 0

#7 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1626 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 29 April 2008 - 01:30 PM

I have been using 5205 quite a bit for nighttime timelapse shots with my Eyemo and Revolution motor, much of what I have been doing has been capturing celestial movement at night, stars going by with earthly objects like cities and houses, trees, etc in frame. I also did a music video for a marching band a while ago which was all 7205 much of it shot at Coney Island during the day and night. I have been using 05 under mixed lighting without filters and have been very happy with it's mixed lighting quality with tungsten and Sodium, etc. sources rendering pleasantly and easily bent back in telecine. I do not know if I would select it as a primary stock in a all tungsten job but it does do well under mixed light and is a great stock..

-Rob-
  • 0


Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Glidecam

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

The Slider

Glidecam

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks