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Single Frame print


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#1 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 10:15 PM

Hello,

Has anyone every had a frame printed to photo paper? I'd like to get a frame off of a 16mm roll and printed in the same way that a photographer would.

Has anyone done this? I'm wondering how far one can blow it up (in terms of inches). It's OK if it gets a bit abstract. I've used 7231 negative. Also, where might I have it done and how would I identify the exact frame?

Thanks in advanced.
T
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 10:29 PM

Tim,

You just need to find or make a negative holder for 16mm size negatives and use a normal B&W enlarger and darkroom set up. Never done this with 16mm film, but I made a negative holder years ago to hold micro film of motorcycle exploded parts lists and would print copies of the lists in my darkroom.

Now that everything is digital, I made a special slide that holds 16mm film and fits into my Nikon Coolscan film scanner so I can scan individual frames of 16mm and Super 16mm. It works pretty well.

Those are some ideas.

Best,
-Tim
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#3 Richardson Leao

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 06:02 AM

Tim,

You just need to find or make a negative holder for 16mm size negatives and use a normal B&W enlarger and darkroom set up. Never done this with 16mm film, but I made a negative holder years ago to hold micro film of motorcycle exploded parts lists and would print copies of the lists in my darkroom.

Now that everything is digital, I made a special slide that holds 16mm film and fits into my Nikon Coolscan film scanner so I can scan individual frames of 16mm and Super 16mm. It works pretty well.

Those are some ideas.

Best,
-Tim


Exactly, sometimes I do print two stripes of film together to see differences in contrast. BW (7231) is even easier as u don't need color paper or a color head (enlarger). Identifying the frame though... that has to be done either w/ the time code and film counter or by visual inspection. If you sent this to commercial labs to do, I presume you will have to cut your film, while, if you have access to a darkroom, you can enlarge your frame without cutting the film (with rewinders). Also, you can blow it up many, many centimeters (16mm is used in projection rooms and virtually, you could use a paper as big as the projection screen).
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 06:07 AM

We did 16mm frame still blow ups on a B & W film I made years ago. There wasn't much money and we only had annuals rather than dailies - the neg got processed but there wasn't enough money for the rush print. The odd frame was taken from the out takes and blown up.

The prints worked OK, if a bit grainy since we were shooting on Double X and Ilford MKV.
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