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Bad Kino Examples


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#1 Ethan Vali

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 02:15 PM

As I have been reading it seems as though there are some very mixed opinions about kinos and that it definitely seems possible/easy to use them improperly.

I was wondering if anyone has any examples of kinos that do not look good. Also if you could say something about why it doesn't look good and what you would do to make it look better.

Thanks
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 03:33 PM

You can use ANY tool "badly," and you can use the wrong tool for the job. Even a fresnel can look bad if it's not the right tool for what you're trying to do, or if you don't know how to use it.

I can't speak for everyone, but it seems most people complain about the way kino's look when they just turn them on and expect them to be a perfect soft source, right out of the box. No light is that simple -- a light is just a light, a raw material. It's not perfect until you shape it they way you want with color, diffusion, flags, and whatnot. If it's not soft enough, then put diffusion in front of it (and not necessarily right ON the unit, either). If it's not the right color, then gel it. If you put up a 4' 4-bank and try to use it as a key light, it's going to look like -- guess what -- a 4' fluorescent light! If that's not the quality you want, then don't use it that way! Turn it diagonal and put a 4' 250 frame in front of it if you want a soft key.

Another mistake I see all the f@<%^n' time is people putting up a Kino with the eggcrate on for controllability, and then try to soften it by putting Opal on top of the eggcrate, of course losing the controllability, so they then squeeze the doors in more to focus it. Well quess what -- you just made a little hard slit of light! No wonder you don't like the way it looks...

BTW, a little trick for adding controllability to a "raw" Kino is to double-layer the egg crates, borrowing one from another unit. Make sure the crates line up nicely so you don't just kill the output.

Another "improper use" example I've seen -- people mixing daylight and tungsten tubes in the same unit to make "1/2 blue." On its own there's nothing wrong with that, but inevitably someone squeezes the doors in to control spill, and you end up with alternating bands of blue and orange light instead of an even color. One trick I learned from David Mullen here is to use daylight balanced tubes with 1/2 CTO to make 4300K, since you're starting with full brightness and using a less dense gel than 1/2 CTB on tungsten tubes.

One legitimate beef people have against kino's is that sometimes the tubes don't quite match other light sources, or even each other. This can be a little frustrating at times, but no light technology is perfect or maintenance-free. Fluorescents, HMI's, and tungsten all suffer color shifts with age (and other problems), so you take the time to troubleshoot the gear by changing out bulbs or gelling things to match. Personally I can't stand Kino's 2900K tubes, because they're too pink and don't match anything.

Some people don't like HMI's; some people don't like gelling tungsten with CTB; some people don't like Kino's. They each do have their quirks, yet people manage to work with them successfully anyway...
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