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#1 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 07:23 AM

hi i am going to be shooting a little short thats coming up soon - thats in a local shop with flourescents overhead. I was thinking to turn them off. considering that I am a novice in terms of lighting, I was wondering what the best way was to go about it. I will be shooting on kodak 500t, and I have a big window at the front with lots of natural light coming in. So if I light inside with tungsten lights, will I have to gel the whole of the window to compensate for the 500t? Thanks for your time,

R

Edited by Ralph Tabith, 01 April 2008 - 07:25 AM.

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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 01:48 PM

Try a search of "fluorscent lighting," since we discuss this exact situation about twice a year here.

The short answer is the obvious -- if you want all your lighting to have the same color temperature, you have to gel them to match each other, or change out bulbs/tubes so that they all match. When that can't be done, you use the lights that are most convenient for you (meaning controllability and brightness), and you turn the others off.
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#3 Michael Collier

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 02:05 PM

You'd probably have the stop to shoot through an 85b on lens, and replace the floros with tungsten balanced tubes. Or turn them off and light with gelled tungsten floor units. That would be much easier that gelling the whole window. Consider your power limits, if your window is really bright, you might find you need A LOT of tungsten power, to compensate for the gel. if your struggling for stop, or just want a warmer look try gelling with 1/2 CTB instead of full.
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#4 Ralph Tabith

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 02:42 PM

You'd probably have the stop to shoot through an 85b on lens, and replace the floros with tungsten balanced tubes. Or turn them off and light with gelled tungsten floor units. That would be much easier that gelling the whole window. Consider your power limits, if your window is really bright, you might find you need A LOT of tungsten power, to compensate for the gel. if your struggling for stop, or just want a warmer look try gelling with 1/2 CTB instead of full.


thanks for the responses guys - ill get on it....
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 03:19 PM

...and replace the floros with tungsten balanced tubes.


You mean daylight balanced, in this case.
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rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Visual Products

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Abel Cine

Tai Audio