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walkie talkie lingos


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#1 Jay Pak

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 11:15 PM

Can you tell me all the lingos for walkies. Also designated channels for each departments.

Thanks a bunch.
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 11:22 PM

1- production/AD
6 - camera
7 - electric
8 - grip

"copy that" or "copy" to confirm you heard an order.
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#3 Jay Pak

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 11:37 PM

1- production/AD
6 - camera
7 - electric
8 - grip

"copy that" or "copy" to confirm you heard an order.




Thank you.

Actually, Is there a designated Art, Vanity, and other departments?
Or is it 1st Ad appoints them in.

I know the following lingos...
copy that, what's your 20, 10-1, 10-2
echo the call, hot set, flying in, grace, martini, hot set
reset, back to 1, pictures up, switching, go to (channel #)...What else?
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 11:48 PM

Well there are million shorthand names or nicknames for things on set. But that's not the same as terms used over the walkie. For example "hot set" is just a term, it's not something generally said over a walkie...

"that's lunch"
"we're back" (or in)
"if it ain't workin' it's jerkin' "
"that's a wrap"

These are things usually called out by the AD, but sometimes each department will relay the message to their own members who may be away from set, and on another channel. Sometimes it helps for someone on set to announce "rolling" and "cut" to department members who may be working off-set but making noise, or trying to bring gear in through doors, etc.
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#5 Tom Lowe

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 01:15 AM

All you need to do is rent Smokey and the Bandit, and you'll be impressing everyone on set in no time.

"I think I just went 10-100"
"Better than 10-200"

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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 02:50 AM

...go to (channel #)


"Go to channel 2" is one you'll hear a lot. It's reserved as a private line when something doesn't concern everyone on your channel.

"What's your E.T.A." was a new one I heard last week, to which I replied "What the hell is an E.T.A.?" Estimated Time of Arrival

And never say "Flying in" unless it's a serious rush.
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#7 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 05:58 PM

Actually, Is there a designated Art, Vanity, and other departments?

Set dressing is generally channel 4 and I think props is often 5. Don't know about makeup or hair...I assume they're just on 1 most of the time. I think transpo is generally 3.
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#8 Michael Nash

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 06:13 PM

"What's your E.T.A." was a new one I heard last week, to which I replied "What the hell is an E.T.A.?" Estimated Time of Arrival


That's an OLD term, surprised you'd never heard it. My Dad taught me that when I was kid; they used to use it when he was in the Navy.
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 06:39 PM

It wouldn't hurt to learn pig-speak. Police or military phonetics are useful when you have to spell stuff out on the radio. People will laugh at you if you try to Super Trooper the phonetics. Here's a useful link:

http://en.wikipedia....onetic_alphabet

Here, you can get the 10 codes. You'll use only a few of these on set (hopefully):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten-code
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#10 Tom Lowe

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 09:32 AM

That's an OLD term, surprised you'd never heard it. My Dad taught me that when I was kid; they used to use it when he was in the Navy.


Most of this stuff has military roots.
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#11 Adam Richman

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:05 PM

When called for specifically it's always good practice to respond with "go for _____ (your name)" to let them know you're now available and can respond.

In addition to calling "copy that", it's also good to repeat what's being asked for. So if you're gripping and you hear on the grip channel "we need a c-stand on standby" you'd respond "c-stand on standby, copy that". This gives whoever called for the stand a chance to correct themselves and for you to make sure you heard them right. That one sentence would save a trip back to the truck and some not-so-nice looks from the AD.

To consolidate, I've got:

1 - Production/AD
2 - Private Line
3 - Transpo
4 - Set Dressing
5 - Props
6 - Camera
7 - Electric
8 - Grip

Does that look right to everyone?
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#12 timHealy

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:15 PM

1 - Production/AD
2 - Private Line
3 - Transpo
4 - Set Dressing
5 - Props
6 - Camera
7 - Electric
8 - Grip

Does that look right to everyone?


It depends where you are.

In NY generally:

1 - production including Locations, wardrobe, and maybe makeup if they have a walkie on the truck
2 - additional production (this is where everyone else goes when some asks some else to go to 2 to eves drop. There is not such thing as private on a film shoot)
3 - additional production when 2 is too busy
5 - grip
6 - electric
16 - teamsters

I 'm not sure about camera and props typical channels

best

Tim
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#13 Michael Grugal

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 01:36 PM

It wouldn't hurt to learn pig-speak.



Not cool.
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#14 Paul Bruening

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 10:15 PM

I used to be in casino security. That's what the county cops called it. We just called it what they did. Nothing personal.
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#15 Frank Barrera

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 10:54 PM

one of my favorites is instead of saying "walkie check" you say "wookie check". if it's a positive check then someone makes the sound of Chewbacca from Star Wars. I could listen to that all day...

f
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#16 James Brown

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 06:16 AM

From a lighting perspective - , "traveling", "walk away", "double/single down", "send it to go to bed", "it's a hollywood", "standing by".

I guess there is so many and it works with individuals and their crew. The boss may call for the "shmurg from the dooveldot" and you see an electric run to the back of set and grab some wire bags from a picker.

every set and every crew is different.

James.
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