Jump to content


Photo

Shooting in the desert


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Rob.m.Neilson

Rob.m.Neilson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 April 2008 - 04:29 PM

I'm going to be shooting a feature this summer, part of which will be out on location in the nevada and utah deserts.

I'll be shooting with an HVX and a 35mm adapter rig...what would be the best way to protect my camera from the excessive dust.

Thanks in advance.
  • 0

#2 Gunnar Mortensen

Gunnar Mortensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Hollywood CA

Posted 04 April 2008 - 10:20 PM

When I shot a music video in the desert. we covered all the bits of the camera in a trash bag, tore holes for the lens and eyepiece, taped it all up with an optical flat in the front of the lens. We were shooting in a sand storm and it was pretty bad but the camera stayed relatively clean. I think there was only one spot on the neg. Note use a white or clear bag as not to draw as much heat. On your focus disc put all the lens marks on one side and your focus on the other so you can always have a reference.
  • 0

#3 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 04 April 2008 - 11:14 PM

The desert during the summer??

The heat will kill you after it makes everything difficult.

You could easily shoot in October or November or in May and it'll look the same.

Best

Tim
  • 0

#4 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 05 April 2008 - 01:34 AM

This is the type of location, I've had some small experience with, rain jackets actually work real well under blowing conditions (FXs made or nature made), also flag the camera or put an umbrella over you and it and the sun will be much kinder to you both. If you're shooting during the day you'll probably have ND or Pola filters on the camera anyway so the lens should be relatively safe though a optical glass filter is always a good idea. Carry lots of canned air to blow the dust off parts and glass and make sure when the wind whips up (around here winds are fierce and relentless) that you have something clean to cover the camera but prior to that, try and keep it out of the blowing sand in the first place also try and keep equipment out of direct sunlight if possible cause things heat up very quickly in the desert sun especially at higher altitudes (we're at 4000 ft, I think much of Nevada and Utah are higher) for your self, make sure you have plenty of water and don't necessarily rely on the company have enough on hand when you need it. When you get hot and tired, you make mistakes and that's when equipment gets damaged so take care of yourself and the equipment will tend to fair better. It's all pretty much common sense really, but it never hurts to review. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 05 April 2008 - 01:36 AM.

  • 0

#5 Rob.m.Neilson

Rob.m.Neilson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 April 2008 - 12:05 PM

Thanks guys all good advice....I have a 15 year old splash bag that more than covers the camera. Im just going to cut some holes in it for the XLR and Monitor out and try to keep it in there all the time.

Very good idea about marking off all the lens marks on the follow focus, obvious but I hadn't even thought of that.

Id much rather be shooting this there in the fall or winter, but I gotta do what I gotta do!
  • 0


Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

The Slider

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Opal

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Glidecam