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question about color temperature/light meter


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#1 Malik Sajid

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Posted 05 April 2008 - 02:43 AM

hello everyone

I am a newbie here actually studying video production as my majors.
i thought of to post on the forums, but thought that the questions are quite of a beginners level, soooooo you know

Well, everywhere i read that the color temperature for indoor is 3200 k and at outdoors its 5600 k around. What i want to know is how this color temperature affect on setting lighting mood, and how can we measure the temperature. whats the light meter for? Does it tell the temperature and calculates the appropriate settings for aperture or etc.

Suppose i am at student level, i got four 1000 watt open face tungston lights for an assignment, how can i use those 4 lights and get the 3200 k temperature.

i realize that its quite a strange question, or i am not been able to tell you.

anywayz

waiting for your reply
hope you don't mind

thanks
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#2 Valerio Sacchetto

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Posted 05 April 2008 - 05:44 AM

Well, everywhere i read that the color temperature for indoor is 3200 k and at outdoors its 5600 k around. What i want to know is how this color temperature affect on setting lighting mood, and how can we measure the temperature. whats the light meter for? Does it tell the temperature and calculates the appropriate settings for aperture or etc.

You're quite confused about light properties.
Color temperature is measured with a color meter and it has nothing to do with your aperture, it's a quality of light. The quantity of light is measured with a light meter and that's what is important to determine your aperture.
It's important to know the color of light because while our brain adapts easily to different color temperatures film can't do so, it comes in two types: tungsten and daylight. That means that it's balanced for either one. If you're shooting under tungsten lights you'd use tungsten stock which gives you an accurate rendition of the colors of objects that are lighted by light that has a 3200K color temperature.
http://en.wikipedia....lor_temperature
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Lightmeter
http://en.wikipedia....lor_temperature

Suppose i am at student level, i got four 1000 watt open face tungston lights for an assignment, how can i use those 4 lights and get the 3200 k temperature.

color temperature is not tied to the number of units you use, you have 4 tungsten lights that will give you, no matter how you arrange them, ~3200k
A different story is for quantity, you can add them up to get a proper exposure for the stock you're using keeping in mind the mood you want to get.

These are very basic questions and i suggest you to buy or borrow from your local library a book about photography it will tell you those essential things. Good luck!
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#3 Malik Sajid

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 07:44 AM

yah yah....i m confused ........thats why i asked....

and i work on dv, never used film.......

but yah, you are right, i have to have a study of basic lighting.


You're quite confused about light properties.
Color temperature is measured with a color meter and it has nothing to do with your aperture, it's a quality of light. The quantity of light is measured with a light meter and that's what is important to determine your aperture.
It's important to know the color of light because while our brain adapts easily to different color temperatures film can't do so, it comes in two types: tungsten and daylight. That means that it's balanced for either one. If you're shooting under tungsten lights you'd use tungsten stock which gives you an accurate rendition of the colors of objects that are lighted by light that has a 3200K color temperature.
http://en.wikipedia....lor_temperature
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Lightmeter
http://en.wikipedia....lor_temperature

color temperature is not tied to the number of units you use, you have 4 tungsten lights that will give you, no matter how you arrange them, ~3200k
A different story is for quantity, you can add them up to get a proper exposure for the stock you're using keeping in mind the mood you want to get.

These are very basic questions and i suggest you to buy or borrow from your local library a book about photography it will tell you those essential things. Good luck!


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#4 Malik Sajid

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 02:30 AM

and when we say 1k light, 2k light, the "k" is kilo, right? kilo watt, its not kelvin?
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#5 Malik Sajid

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 02:31 AM

and when we say 1k light, 2k light, the "k" is kilo, right? kilo watt, its not kelvin?
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#6 Valerio Sacchetto

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 07:37 AM

and when we say 1k light, 2k light, the "k" is kilo, right? kilo watt, its not kelvin?


yup :)
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#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 01:04 PM

and i work on dv, never used film.......


Doesn't matter, it's still the same principle. Normally you would white balance either for tungsten 3200k or daylight 5600k, or anywhere below or in-between.
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Tai Audio

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Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

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Metropolis Post

The Slider

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