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SDX900 Got WET!


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#1 Gary Stocks

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 12:23 PM

I was shooting some footage in a pool with a Panasonic SDX900 and some water was splashed on the back side of the camera near the battery. It shut down immediately but after an hour of just sitting it still will not power on, while even using a different battery. Is the camera fried and does it need to be fixed? If so, what part may need to be replaced? Or do I need to just let it dry out overnight? Thanks!
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#2 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 12:32 PM

Try resetting the breaker button on the lower back left of the camera by pushing it in.
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#3 Gary Stocks

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 01:14 PM

I tried that with no luck, it does not appeared to be popped. I did replace the internal Lithium battery and that at least made the time code display pop on when I hook up a battery. However nothing else functions.




Try resetting the breaker button on the lower back left of the camera by pushing it in.


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#4 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 02:01 PM

It has the anton bauer back?


Unscrew the two screws and lok at the wiring in it or to see if water is still in it. It has something to do with this. Check the fuses on the batts too. It tough to get water in the camera unless you dipped it.
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#5 Gary Stocks

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 02:20 PM

Took off the casing and there was no standing water. I can hook up a battery at this point and the time code display comes on and I was even able to use the zoom for a minute but nothing came up in the viewfinder and after a minute the zoom stopped working again. It did not get dipped in the water but the back end of the camera was splashed pretty well with water from the pool. I am wondering if the longer I wait for it to dry out if it will begin to work fully again? Almost like a cell phone that get submerged in water takes a day to dry out and then works again.
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#6 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 02:24 PM

Open the left side of the camera and pull out the cards and look at them. The back card is the power supply. If water got in you will see it. Air blow the cards with canned air if htey look wet but check that back card first. Its lablled power.
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 02:54 PM

I've had the odd piece of electronic kit go down in the wet, although not a full camera - just the V/F in one case and leaving it to dry for a day or two seems to short it out.
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#8 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 02:59 PM

Bottom line for any wet equipment is to get the water out. Chlorine is not a friend to curcuit boards. Best to open the camera, take out each card and spray both sides with air. Also spray the female connector the card snaps into in the camera. If it's not your camera, just wait, it may dry out, but if it is you will eventually see teh water damage appear as cold solder joints and oxidation.
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#9 Gary Stocks

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 03:32 PM

If you could please describe the "cards" I am no exactly sure what I am looking for.
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 04:01 PM

I've had the odd piece of electronic kit go down in the wet, although not a full camera - just the V/F in one case and leaving it to dry for a day or two seems to short it out.


Errrr... sort it rather than short it. This was heavy duty rain rather than pool water.
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#11 Hal Smith

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 04:06 PM

Errrr... sort it rather than short it. This was heavy duty rain rather than pool water.

Rain water is usually pretty benign. I'd take as many covers off the camera as you can and place an electric box heater a couple of feet way from it and blow warm, dry air past it for maybe four or five days, changing sides every day. Don't get the heater any closer distance to the camera than you can hold your hand from the front of the fan.
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#12 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 07:24 PM

No water is benign, at least once it mixes with the salts, and chemicals found in electronics. Here's a simple way to best deal with electronic equipment that gets wet. You must try to get the moisture off the circuit boards before it has time to oxidize and cause trouble. Sure some of you have had wetness issues that ended up not being a noticable problem, but most wetness issues end up with problems later on. Leaving stuff 'out to dry' means whatever residues are left after the water evaporates can and will cause issues later on. Salt, pool, rain, or distilled are all potentially damaging to electronics. If your camera can be opened, I'd say use high pressure air to try to blow as much of the residue out. If it has removeable cuircuit boards, remove them, inspect for moisture and blow off with air. make sure any contacts are not wet. Then leave it all out to dry. It's best not to leave it encased and closed as moisture will tend to be trapped like a greenhouse and cause even more damage.
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#13 Gary Stocks

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Posted 14 April 2008 - 02:40 PM

I tried that all weekend with no luck. It is in the shop now and i will report back what they have to do to it. Thanks for all the help.



No water is benign, at least once it mixes with the salts, and chemicals found in electronics. Here's a simple way to best deal with electronic equipment that gets wet. You must try to get the moisture off the circuit boards before it has time to oxidize and cause trouble. Sure some of you have had wetness issues that ended up not being a noticable problem, but most wetness issues end up with problems later on. Leaving stuff 'out to dry' means whatever residues are left after the water evaporates can and will cause issues later on. Salt, pool, rain, or distilled are all potentially damaging to electronics. If your camera can be opened, I'd say use high pressure air to try to blow as much of the residue out. If it has removeable cuircuit boards, remove them, inspect for moisture and blow off with air. make sure any contacts are not wet. Then leave it all out to dry. It's best not to leave it encased and closed as moisture will tend to be trapped like a greenhouse and cause even more damage.


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The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Visual Products

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Willys Widgets