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Which these way is less difficult to become a director ?


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#1 Fan Marques

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 04:44 AM

Beginning as AD or writer-director ?

So, I've an impression and I see there is a current for who is joining in the industry as writer-director, the person wrote a good script and talk to some agents and the producer may guarantee to him the role as film director of his script. (I think, maybe) some thought of a producer or company like "the man has an good idea and a script well wrote for we earn money, we bought the script license and if it wish direct and has been showing to us his creativity, that it also has good knowledge about how all works even it never had directed some feature film before, Ok, no problem, it'll direct and will has support of others professionals." Or the dude can make some like a short-film just like James Wan made in Saw and maybe become easier his guarantee in direction if really the company was determined to make that film.

But someone begins as AD looks harder, I don't know, the AD is in charge of planning filming days, coordinating the equipments in the location, taking care of figurantes (seems a little technical, uneventful, not so different in most of his films). So, if one day, one day... a producer looks to him differently, it may be invited to direct a script of another person.

And mainly, It's very rare to see on IMDb directors credited ever in his life as AD before.

I would like anyone criticize If I've made mistakes through of a point of view mine that is different in the industry and post his opinion about the question Which these way is less difficult to become a director ? Beginning as AD or writer-director ?

Thanks so much for the attention reading my question and sorry for my english.
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#2 Zamir Merali

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 10:07 PM

Uhh.
Which is harder, working you way up to being president of the united states or starting your own county and deeming yourself president.

Both ways work. However, getting a good script can be the hardest thing in the world. Depends if you have the talent.

Do you?
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 11:21 PM

The Assistant Directing department has more to do with the logistics of getting a movie made than it has to do with the creativity involved. With that in mind, that path leads through the UPM to Producing, not Directing.

While Directors can indeed come from anywhere inside or outside of the industry, more often than not, new Directors will have been Screenwriters who develop the proper relationships that put them in place for that opportunity. Directors also frequently come from Second Unit DPs and Second Unit Stunt Coordinators. Others have come from the Art Department.

In all cases, they must somehow impress someone else that they have the creativity and capability to deliver a quality project on time and within the budget. It isn't always about the work and sometimes has more to do with the relationships formed. Sometimes it is about the work and the personalities don't play into it as much. Politics can help or hurt, it all depends on who you happen to be dealing with at that particular time.

So, it is a great idea to work inside the industry in order to develop the proper relationships, but not every position is a path to Directing. Not directly anyway.

Good luck!
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#4 Fan Marques

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 02:04 AM

Uhh.
Which is harder, working you way up to being president of the united states or starting your own county and deeming yourself president.

Both ways work. However, getting a good script can be the hardest thing in the world. Depends if you have the talent.

Do you?

Everyone that likes to write at least should believe that it has some talent or it would not think about to begin to write. I just unfortunately need to improve my english a lot, so I'll begin to write in my native tongue.

Thanks for reply.
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#5 Fan Marques

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 02:13 AM

The Assistant Directing department has more to do with the logistics of getting a movie made than it has to do with the creativity involved. With that in mind, that path leads through the UPM to Producing, not Directing.

While Directors can indeed come from anywhere inside or outside of the industry, more often than not, new Directors will have been Screenwriters who develop the proper relationships that put them in place for that opportunity. Directors also frequently come from Second Unit DPs and Second Unit Stunt Coordinators. Others have come from the Art Department.

In all cases, they must somehow impress someone else that they have the creativity and capability to deliver a quality project on time and within the budget. It isn't always about the work and sometimes has more to do with the relationships formed. Sometimes it is about the work and the personalities don't play into it as much. Politics can help or hurt, it all depends on who you happen to be dealing with at that particular time.

So, it is a great idea to work inside the industry in order to develop the proper relationships, but not every position is a path to Directing. Not directly anyway.

Good luck!


But how to direct with only the script in his hands without never had directed a short-film or feature-film before ? How some directors get a role in the directing of his films only showing the script that it wrote ? Even it having relationships in the industry, how the talent is stated sufficiently to get into in the directing of film ?

Thanks for reply.
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#6 Keneu Luca

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 01:10 AM

But how to direct with only the script in his hands without never had directed a short-film or feature-film before ?

Your answer is in your question. Make a cheap practical short film. Even though I only shoot film, I do realize that content is more important than format. Shoot on cheap video. Start simple. Create the story around your resources and around any creativity you may have. In your position, your resources and your creative ability dictate the story. Take baby steps.


How some directors get a role in the directing of his films only showing the script that it wrote ? Even it having relationships in the industry, how the talent is stated sufficiently to get into in the directing of film ?

Thanks for reply.


Any number of ways. They come from a family with money and financed the film themselves, or are good friends with people who have money. Or they have, in some way, demonstrated a solid understanding of the complexities of constructing a story visually and the ability to effectively work with actors. This requires, among many other things, objectivity. Or they sharpened their ability to get on their knees and...well..should I continue?
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#7 Fan Marques

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 09:43 PM

Your answer is in your question. Make a cheap practical short film. Even though I only shoot film, I do realize that content is more important than format. Shoot on cheap video. Start simple. Create the story around your resources and around any creativity you may have. In your position, your resources and your creative ability dictate the story. Take baby steps.




Any number of ways. They come from a family with money and financed the film themselves, or are good friends with people who have money. Or they have, in some way, demonstrated a solid understanding of the complexities of constructing a story visually and the ability to effectively work with actors. This requires, among many other things, objectivity. Or they sharpened their ability to get on their knees and...well..should I continue?


Thanks for reply Keneu.

So, I've been taking a look on people that get into film school and after spends a lot money to make short-films to impress some agent, but looks the most of them has not luck and almost always they goes to work as freelancer editor. I would like to know about that "luck", they has not luck or talent ? Hollywood knows to take advantage of talented aspirant to directors or really there are a plenty of untalented people who only thinks that it is a good director but it just knows to lose money with his short-films ?

Edited by Fan Marques, 22 April 2008 - 09:45 PM.

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#8 Keneu Luca

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:35 PM

Thanks for reply Keneu.

So, I've been taking a look on people that get into film school and after spends a lot money to make short-films to impress some agent, but looks the most of them has not luck and almost always they goes to work as freelancer editor. I would like to know about that "luck", they has not luck or talent ? Hollywood knows to take advantage of talented aspirant to directors or really there are a plenty of untalented people who only thinks that it is a good director but it just knows to lose money with his short-films ?


I'm getting the impression that you are to worried about "breaking into Hollywood" more than you about the actual work and art. I know this is true aboust many aspiring and student filmmakers.

The most important thing is the art.

If you are more interested in fame and and money being associated with Hollywood, you are going to fail.

The word "passion" is often used. A director, moreso than any other film position, can only thrive if they carry within them genuine passion. You have ideas that keep you up at night. You cant sleep. Your social life suffers, your relationships suffer, because you are more concerned with bringing those ideas you have to life. You are not, at all, worried about money, fame or Hollywood. Its those stories and characters that talk to you in your head. If you do not know what Im talking about, you need to reconsider what you want to do with your life.

A true artist doesnt choose to make films - they need to. Otherwise they will drift off into insanity and or become suicidal. It is that serious.

Don't think about Hollywood. And to be honest, I dont know why any talented filmmaker would want to work within the confines of Hollywood. The aspiring filmmaker begins independent, and many, by choice, stay that way. An independent director needs to find producers that will have faith in their talent. And short films is the way to start.
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#9 Fan Marques

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 10:13 PM

I'm getting the impression that you are to worried about "breaking into Hollywood" more than you about the actual work and art. I know this is true aboust many aspiring and student filmmakers.

The most important thing is the art.

If you are more interested in fame and and money being associated with Hollywood, you are going to fail.

The word "passion" is often used. A director, moreso than any other film position, can only thrive if they carry within them genuine passion. You have ideas that keep you up at night. You cant sleep. Your social life suffers, your relationships suffer, because you are more concerned with bringing those ideas you have to life. You are not, at all, worried about money, fame or Hollywood. Its those stories and characters that talk to you in your head. If you do not know what Im talking about, you need to reconsider what you want to do with your life.

A true artist doesnt choose to make films - they need to. Otherwise they will drift off into insanity and or become suicidal. It is that serious.

Don't think about Hollywood. And to be honest, I dont know why any talented filmmaker would want to work within the confines of Hollywood. The aspiring filmmaker begins independent, and many, by choice, stay that way. An independent director needs to find producers that will have faith in their talent. And short films is the way to start.


I understand completely what you've said, my asks are as regards "how to break into hollywood" not because I want to become rich and famous, at all, It's because I don't understand very well hollywood; but hollywood or any cinema industry also stand for "money to make his films", no money = no film, to make films is not cheap, it's not possible to finance all my films at all, if this was possible, probably I would be already a millionaire making films, but I'm not rich. And as any artist his art is intended to show to the people, to the world, necessitating of distributors, not only to keep the films to themselves, so, it needs the industry, but ok, thanks anyway.

I also agree you all about the true artist, all you've said, the need to make films, and in addition a plenty of true artist hates film school. I ask about why student filmmakers doesn't get into hollywood because I've already seen some of their short-films before, they uses many techniques "how-to-do" learnt at film school, remake scenes of some feature-films, sometimes It's visible their talent absence but I don't know if they are the exception or the plurality, it seems that mama and dad wish that the son become a star and they spend a lot money for this, and certainly this is not my posture.

Thanks.

Edited by Fan Marques, 23 April 2008 - 10:17 PM.

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#10 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 07:01 AM

I understand completely what you've said, my asks are as regards "how to break into hollywood" not because I want to become rich and famous, at all, It's because I don't understand very well hollywood; but hollywood or any cinema industry also stand for "money to make his films", no money = no film, to make films is not cheap, it's not possible to finance all my films at all, if this was possible, probably I would be already a millionaire making films, but I'm not rich. And as any artist his art is intended to show to the people, to the world, necessitating of distributors, not only to keep the films to themselves, so, it needs the industry, but ok, thanks anyway.

I also agree you all about the true artist, all you've said, the need to make films, and in addition a plenty of true artist hates film school. I ask about why student filmmakers doesn't get into hollywood because I've already seen some of their short-films before, they uses many techniques "how-to-do" learnt at film school, remake scenes of some feature-films, sometimes It's visible their talent absence but I don't know if they are the exception or the plurality, it seems that mama and dad wish that the son become a star and they spend a lot money for this, and certainly this is not my posture.

Thanks.


I understand what you are looking for and you are entirely correct. I don't think that most people who want to be Directors are necessarily looking for the fame or the money. What people genuinely want is a CAREER doing what it is they want to do and to make a decent living at it. Being a "starving artist" for the sake of making art can get exhausting after a while. Making art for art's sake doesn't pay the rent or pay off the car. Art for art's sake can't put the kids through school or help finance a decent vacation.

So, to "get a job" as a career Director you DO have to go prove that you are an artist (creative) and you also have to possess some quality that helps other (with money) believe that you can create "art" that is also profitable. That's the "business" in Show Business.

As far as what kind of short films to make, you do have to go back to the ideas that inspire YOU. Playing the "what will attract Hollywood" game doesn't necessarily work because by the time you see what's on screens, the "next best thing" is already being bought and put into preproduction. So if you see a bunch of teen/horror flicks in your local movie theater and decide to make one of those, you're already behind the 8-Ball because studios are now financing some other genre that you'll see a year or two later.

So, yes, you have to be an artist and make the movies you want to make. Then it's a matter of marketing yourself and your product to convince those with money that you can make money for them by virtue of your "art." They must believe in what is on screen and believe that you, as a person, can deliver a marketable product. It is difficult, no doubt about that, but it isn't impossible. There are plenty of "career Directors" who remain fairly anonymous, so fame isn't part of their quest. But they do make a very comfortable living because they work a lot delivering solid product.
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#11 Fan Marques

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:53 PM

I understand what you are looking for and you are entirely correct. I don't think that most people who want to be Directors are necessarily looking for the fame or the money. What people genuinely want is a CAREER doing what it is they want to do and to make a decent living at it. Being a "starving artist" for the sake of making art can get exhausting after a while. Making art for art's sake doesn't pay the rent or pay off the car. Art for art's sake can't put the kids through school or help finance a decent vacation.

So, to "get a job" as a career Director you DO have to go prove that you are an artist (creative) and you also have to possess some quality that helps other (with money) believe that you can create "art" that is also profitable. That's the "business" in Show Business.

As far as what kind of short films to make, you do have to go back to the ideas that inspire YOU. Playing the "what will attract Hollywood" game doesn't necessarily work because by the time you see what's on screens, the "next best thing" is already being bought and put into preproduction. So if you see a bunch of teen/horror flicks in your local movie theater and decide to make one of those, you're already behind the 8-Ball because studios are now financing some other genre that you'll see a year or two later.

So, yes, you have to be an artist and make the movies you want to make. Then it's a matter of marketing yourself and your product to convince those with money that you can make money for them by virtue of your "art." They must believe in what is on screen and believe that you, as a person, can deliver a marketable product. It is difficult, no doubt about that, but it isn't impossible. There are plenty of "career Directors" who remain fairly anonymous, so fame isn't part of their quest. But they do make a very comfortable living because they work a lot delivering solid product.

This is exactly how I think. I'm not able to understand the idiom "behind 8-ball", could you mean better ? I've already read about that, people making horror films because it always is cheap and lucrative genre, but I don't understand if you've meant that someone would be "on right way" if it thinks about to make horror films or if someone is late because many directors already made a many of these films.

Thanks for reply Brian.
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#12 Kirsty Stark

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 07:44 PM

I'm not able to understand the idiom "behind 8-ball", could you mean better ?
Thanks for reply Brian.


Behind the 8-ball means that you're already too late to make these films because they've already been made.
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#13 Fan Marques

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 10:07 PM

Behind the 8-ball means that you're already too late to make these films because they've already been made.


Thanks for the explanation Kirsty.
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#14 Dax McKeever

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 09:54 AM

Your answer is in your question. Make a cheap practical short film. Even though I only shoot film, I do realize that content is more important than format. Shoot on cheap video. Start simple. Create the story around your resources and around any creativity you may have. In your position, your resources and your creative ability dictate the story. Take baby steps.




Any number of ways. They come from a family with money and financed the film themselves, or are good friends with people who have money. Or they have, in some way, demonstrated a solid understanding of the complexities of constructing a story visually and the ability to effectively work with actors. This requires, among many other things, objectivity. Or they sharpened their ability to get on their knees and...well..should I continue?



Have you ever been given a speeding ticket for following the limit, and when you request the cop to show your speed on his meter, he then replies, "I can't show you that. I have information that is secretive." My reply, "that's a public police vehicle officer, paid for by my tax dollars, meaning I have a public access and anything 'secretive' is handled by 'secret service' such as FBI, CIA, other." Of course he then begins to write you a ticket anyway. What can you do, tell him, "NO"?

Sorry for the bla, bla. You're text captured my attention, Keneu. Keep contact.
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#15 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 01:29 PM

This is exactly how I think. I'm not able to understand the idiom "behind 8-ball", could you mean better ? I've already read about that, people making horror films because it always is cheap and lucrative genre, but I don't understand if you've meant that someone would be "on right way" if it thinks about to make horror films or if someone is late because many directors already made a many of these films.

Thanks for reply Brian.



You're welcome!

The thing is, if (for example), Horror Films are your thing, then don't go try to make a Romantic Comedy just because you are hoping that'll be the next best thing. Go make a Horror Film. BUT....

Find a NEW way to make a Horror Film. Remake the genre. Sam Raimi got his start by making the ultra low-budget HIT called EVIL DEAD. It was in the Horror genre, but he weaved in a comic element and essential invented the "Comedy Horror" which paved the way for movies like Freddy Krueger and the like.

Take what you know and what inspires YOU and find a way to inject new energy into it. Somebody has to create the "next best thing." It isn't decided and doesn't just happen. If YOU have an original twist on an old idea, run with it. If you manage to write it, shoot it, edit it and have it finished by December of 2008, then MAYBE somebody in a position of power will see it and love it and the timing will be perfect in December of 2008. Or maybe you'll finish then but it won't capture someone's attention for another six months, or a year, or five years. Or maybe you finished six months late. There's no way to tell and that's the lottery aspect of all of this. Or maybe you have a great idea, but the studio executive who sees it doesn't trust you, but has a filmschool buddy from USC who he believes can take your idea and make it better.

There are so many variables you have no control over that can either help you or completely shut you out of the process and a career. The best you can do is to create what makes YOU happy and then market the heck out of it and yourself. Don't look for logic because there isn't any. On one level, you can help yourself by working hard and creating solid product, be it a script or a finished film. On the other, no matter how great your project or how hard you've worked, all of that can still be trumped by somebody's personal relationship with someone else.

This is not meant to be discouraging (nor encouraging), but merely to express the way it is. Life is short, so you have to fill your time between birth and death with things that make you happy knowing that you might never "make it" to the level you hope for. Not an easy task, and one that I struggle with myself, but that's the reality of life here on planet Earth.
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#16 Fan Marques

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 11:49 PM

You're welcome!

The thing is, if (for example), Horror Films are your thing, then don't go try to make a Romantic Comedy just because you are hoping that'll be the next best thing. Go make a Horror Film. BUT....

Find a NEW way to make a Horror Film. Remake the genre. Sam Raimi got his start by making the ultra low-budget HIT called EVIL DEAD. It was in the Horror genre, but he weaved in a comic element and essential invented the "Comedy Horror" which paved the way for movies like Freddy Krueger and the like.

Take what you know and what inspires YOU and find a way to inject new energy into it. Somebody has to create the "next best thing." It isn't decided and doesn't just happen. If YOU have an original twist on an old idea, run with it. If you manage to write it, shoot it, edit it and have it finished by December of 2008, then MAYBE somebody in a position of power will see it and love it and the timing will be perfect in December of 2008. Or maybe you'll finish then but it won't capture someone's attention for another six months, or a year, or five years. Or maybe you finished six months late. There's no way to tell and that's the lottery aspect of all of this. Or maybe you have a great idea, but the studio executive who sees it doesn't trust you, but has a filmschool buddy from USC who he believes can take your idea and make it better.

There are so many variables you have no control over that can either help you or completely shut you out of the process and a career. The best you can do is to create what makes YOU happy and then market the heck out of it and yourself. Don't look for logic because there isn't any. On one level, you can help yourself by working hard and creating solid product, be it a script or a finished film. On the other, no matter how great your project or how hard you've worked, all of that can still be trumped by somebody's personal relationship with someone else.

This is not meant to be discouraging (nor encouraging), but merely to express the way it is. Life is short, so you have to fill your time between birth and death with things that make you happy knowing that you might never "make it" to the level you hope for. Not an easy task, and one that I struggle with myself, but that's the reality of life here on planet Earth.


I'm truly in love for the genres Drama and Thriller, at times both relating with crime, other times a pure drama that has the focus the life of protagonist. In fact, it seems doesn't makes a lot of money than horror films or action films, my worry is not if I earn money or not at all, this is resulted of my work, but for executive producers that doesn't prefer to run the risk of finance it, in addition I don't know, but it seems very hard for a first director to get finance and get the directing of his own script about drama, not considering the age's directors, it also seems hard to get the directing being a new guy for this genres.

It seems everybody likes Drama, a day someone rent or buy the dvd, but I don't think so much people likes to go for theaters to watch it. Companies wants excellent box office, then why will they run the risk financing some genres with low-budget that at times would profit better on DVD's and cable tv (I suppose) ? and is it too bad for writer/director career when his film profit better on video than box office ?

Feel free completely to say what you wish and think, independent if this is going to discourage me or not.

Very thanks Brian.

Edited by Fan Marques, 29 April 2008 - 11:51 PM.

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#17 Sean Yu

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 11:45 PM

I'm not sure if someone has already posted this, since I didn't read all the replies, but a lot of directors that are making feature films started their careers making TV commercials and music videos. Some of the biggest names like Michael Bay, the Scott brothers, Dominic Sena, Antoine Fuqua, Rob Cohen, Spike Jonze, Zach Snyder, David Fincher, etc started their careers this way. This trend started about 20 years ago. The producer who's been working the most with these directors is Jerry Bruckheimer, who hired them because of their visual styles and had confidence that they could tell a great story as well.

Maybe you want to do something similar. It'll give you the opportunity to make something not quite as big as a feature film, but very professional nonetheless. It's a great way to practice your skills and build up your reel. Now the question is, how do you become a director of TV commercials and music videos?
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#18 Viviana Glz

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 01:43 PM

I'm not sure if someone has already posted this, since I didn't read all the replies, but a lot of directors that are making feature films started their careers making TV commercials and music videos. Some of the biggest names like Michael Bay, the Scott brothers, Dominic Sena, Antoine Fuqua, Rob Cohen, Spike Jonze, Zach Snyder, David Fincher, etc started their careers this way. This trend started about 20 years ago. The producer who's been working the most with these directors is Jerry Bruckheimer, who hired them because of their visual styles and had confidence that they could tell a great story as well.

Maybe you want to do something similar. It'll give you the opportunity to make something not quite as big as a feature film, but very professional nonetheless. It's a great way to practice your skills and build up your reel. Now the question is, how do you become a director of TV commercials and music videos?



i have the same question
how do you become a music videos director?
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#19 Alex de Campi

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 09:00 AM

How do you become a music video director? You hang out at gigs, and have a lot of friends in bands. Or you get lucky here: http://www.radarmusicvideo.com with one of their commissions. Every commission I've got so far has been via a personal friendship (or acquaintance) with the musician...

Then you make about 15 music videos for free, get shown in lots of festivals, and become nearly suicidal because you still can't get repped.

It takes 5x as long as you think to get to be a director who is paid for what they do - and it takes you to the brink of poverty and beyond. Most people's directing career is financed by Mastercard - seriously. In terms of breaking in, music videos are great because in general your costs are covered and you can experiment with various styles and techniqes in 3-minute bursts to help you find your "own". So you get a lot of time on set and a lot of time learning the ins and outs of production... while you write/search for your first short film or feature screenplay. (Read STORY. No, seriously, shut up. Read McKee's STORY.)

I broke into directing from a writing background - I was a published author and screenwriter who had a lot of rock and roll friends. Before I announced to the world that I was a director (I couldn't say it with a straight face for my first five shoots) I spent a year on every film set I could get on as a runner or a camera trainee, from giant features to crappy indie short films straight out of the "worst shoot ever' thread. I learned the basics of lighting, sound, and cinematography. I also had a drama background, so was familiar with the actor's process. Also very importantly, I met a gang of people about my age across all departments and they became my team. They got paid crappy day rates to make low-budget music videos for me and we all rose up together.

I'm still learning, but I feel I have a decent grip on my cinematic style now. I know what an Alex de Campi film should look like (er, Circuschrome levels of colour saturation, aggressive framing combined with a certain old-skool European mannerist composition, a more Japanese/Korean pacing...). My intention was to do a couple short films to show this, then my first writer-director feature, but the music video thing is really taken off (I am actually getting well-paid gigs now) and I think I'm about to be attached to someone's Hollywood feature (it's in negotiation).

But oh my god, you have to be tough. I've seen directors "quit" after six months (!!!) because The World Has Not Recognised Their Genius. Unfortunately it's only about 10% genius... and 90% being too ornery to quit.

So, in short:

* Get on set, learn from real people on the job.

* Practice directing on things that are not your lovely perfect first short film, because there is a 99% chance your script sucks and you'll make a total hash out of it if you try to do that first and will waste all your money.

* Watch every movie you can - old, new, foreign, whatever - and make a list of the shots/techniques you want to steal from them, and think about why you like these shots - how framing, movement, etc helps convey the emotions of the scene.

* Learn to edit; it will make you a more honest director. Eventually you will hand the editing over to somebody else who is better at it than you, but by then you will have learned the important lessons of the "get out of jail" cutaways and of how much coverage is too much / not enough.

* Here's a free tip: on a low budget set, your brain will shut down because you'll be doing the jobs of four people. This is why you can never have too much preproduction - having storyboards and a clear and sensible shot list schedule for each day of shooting will save your life and your project. Then when you're reduced to a gibbering wreck, you just look at the shot list, point at it, point at the picture of the shot, and the camera department's like, OK, we're good.

* Shoot on film at least once, because if nothing else it teaches you the value of rehearsal (for both camera and actor).

* Don't give up. Not ever. Keep working & learning all the time and let the rest of the world catch up with you.

Edited by Alex de Campi, 02 August 2008 - 09:04 AM.

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#20 Fan Marques

Fan Marques
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Posted 18 August 2008 - 07:39 PM

Briefly, Which is most difficult ? To make a good short-film and to write a profitable feature-film or to meet powerful people to watch and judge your work ?
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