Jump to content


Photo

Core Out


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Nick Lombardi

Nick Lombardi

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 16 April 2008 - 10:37 AM

I've recently been shooting a student film on super 16. After a long day of shooting with a few shots to go, I was in the back of a car changing unloading a mag of exposed film when the core (I'm using an SR2) decided to pop out on me and turned around 100-150 of film into spaghetti. That night I decided to hand roll the film back onto a mag (so the emulsion would face out) and then roll it back the correct way. After 3 hours of sitting in the bag trying to hand roll this film, it seemed it wasn't going to work out that way in such small confines.

Here is my problem: if i send the film off to a lab as is, will they be able to untangle the film, clean it, and process it, or do I need to finished rolling film by hand?


Nick Lombardi
  • 0

#2 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 16 April 2008 - 11:50 AM

Yeah those expandable cores can be tricky. I have found it easier to let gravity do its thing by putting the film on your open left hand and with your right hand carefully undoing the core expanding lever and gently pulling up on it while holding on to the end of the film that was clipped to the core so that it doesn't unroll from the center, than pulling on the core as some people I know do.

What I would do is find a photo darkroom and get a set of rewinds and spilt reels and get in there in complete darkness and sort it out, and just do whatever you need to go onto a core with the film emulsion out, tails out. The lab people are going to be pissed off if you send them a mess of a roll and it is considered poor form. My rule of thumb is: I try not to pass my problems along to the next person, no matter how much I think I'm paying them, unless it is stated that they will solve my problems if I am at a dead end.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 16 April 2008 - 11:54 AM.

  • 0

#3 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 16 April 2008 - 08:27 PM

After three hours of trying to untangle it, your negative is going to be a little distressed already. Be prepared to see more sparkle and quite possibly pressure fogging and scratches on your film than you would like.

Saul is right - this needs a darkroom to sort it out. And you need rewinds, and probably an old film editor's bin to allow the neg to collapse into, so you can rewind it from that.

However, although as it's a student film you undoubtedly don't have any budget to pay for this, I suggest strongly you try to get an experienced lab person (or an experienced loader) to handle the neg for you. Don't just parcel it up and ship it to the lab, call them and explain the problem and ask for their advice and support. Frankly, experienced people can handle film tangles relatively easily, inexperienced people are very likely to finish up destroying the film entirely. Most people have done it once in their careers though.

In fact I heard of one DoP who was interviewing a new assistant:
"have you ever dropped the core out of a roll?"
"no sir, never had any problems like that".
"well go away. come back when you have done. You won't do it a second time."
  • 0

#4 Evan Pierre

Evan Pierre
  • Guests

Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:02 AM

Oh boy not good.

In the S16 film I shot about two weeks ago we had two assistants drop the core while lifting it out. Since we had to keep on using that changing bag for the rest of the day and the rest of the week they had to find a quick solution. What we ended up doing was slipping them an extra core, breaking the film at the place were the tangles began, and then rolling up the two separate cores.

The results were mixed, one of the rolls was pretty unusable. Much footage had been lost with all of the ripping and what was still there had markings all over it. Our director described it as if someone had taken the film and scratched it against concrete. I am pretty sure the second dropped roll came out ok besides losing footage that accounted for the breaking.

I think that most of the scratching was caused by our inexperienced loaders putting their fingers on the frames instead of the perforations.

I hope your stuff comes out alright!
  • 0


Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

CineLab

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Opal

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

The Slider

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc