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Filming to references of he director


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#1 Lars Zemskih

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 07:50 AM

Hey everyone,

So the director gave me these references for a scene

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

We are using Vision 2 and my lighting gear is 3 redheads, 1 photex (which I think has a yellowish temperature) and different bulbs.

We are also doing telecine and editing in final cut.

What do you think is the best way to achieve this look? I'm trying to decide whether I should leave to to telecine and then further grading in final cut and color or to start with it on the set.

We are shooting interior.

Edited by Emile Rafael, 19 April 2008 - 07:51 AM.

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#2 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 11:16 AM

What is "that look?" To me, it looks expensive. 35mm, lots of production design, wet down (in the bottom photo,) bunches of 18ks.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 12:15 PM

When I get reference shots like this, I assume that he is looking truly for the feeling or mood that is evoked. So looking at those stills, what I take from it is a generally "warm" feeling. Also, the reference shots show that there are "highlights" within the frame, so letting something go "hot" would probably be welcomed.

Especially if you don't have the same equipment or circumstances, the best thing you can do is try to replicate the mood and feeling that is evoked from a reference shot. Let parts of the frame go black while not being afraid to let highlights blow out. Keep a similar color temperature. And, what stills can't show, "operate" and frame in a way that compliments everything else you're doing and what is asked of you.
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#4 Gus Sacks

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 03:37 PM

Tobacco/Coral/Pro-Mist filters?

And the aforementioned.
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 03:49 PM

In very short form, I would say that you are lighting the area to show depth, warm light will be the rule, and overall you'll likely have a little diffusion and a bit of a warm or brown filter on the lens, maybe a tobacco or light chocolate.

Other than that, it's pretty vague without knowing more. Will your location lend itself well to that style?
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 04:15 PM

With reference pictures I leave technique for last, even if the technique used in the picture is obvious. Instead I concentrate on the feel and tone first, since that's most likely what the director is responding to. Then I look at the common visual elements between the images like color, contrast, texture, light quality, and so forth. From that I'll determine my own approach that makes sense for the film.

In this case what I see in common is a low-key palette with only tiny spots of highlight, a high contrast ratio, a monochromatic amber color scheme, and an even distribution of tones across the frame in a mostly closed-form composition.

Your own lighting technique can be whatever you want it to be, but you've basically got two choices for getting the color: color the lights (with gels), or color the entire image (with a camera filter or in telecine). The difference is that with colored lighting you can control colors independently in the frame; with a colored image it's the entire frame or nothing.
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