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Popular lenses during the 70's?


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#1 Kevin Curtin

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:01 AM

So I am admittedly not very knowledgeable when it comes to the history of lenses, so I was wondering what kinds of lenses were the most commonly used during the 1970's and were there any lens innovations that really furthered the technology? Thanks for any help.
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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:02 AM

The Zeiss Superspeeds got released during the 70s. The Cooke zooms (20-100 and 18-100) as well I think.
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#3 Nick G Smith

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:39 AM

As Max stated the Zeiss Superspeeds were introduced in the late '70s. A good history of Zeiss lenses at cinematechnic.com.

The Canon K35 lenses were introduced around 1977-78 and maybe the Kowa primes around the same time.

The Superspeeds and K35's were innovative as they were faster at T1.4/T1.3 than previous lenses. (Excepting Kubricks specially built T 0.7)

Lens mounts would have been BNCR, Arri bayonet and standard. Arri introduced the PL mount with the 35BL2 or 3 most probably mid to late '70s.

Then there were Balters, Super Balters, Cooke Pancros and Zeiss standards, Lomos and other Russian glass in the USSR

The Cooke zooms were incredibly innovative and introduced in the '70s The 20-100 and later the 25-250. History of these lenses are on the Cooke website.

Also the Angenieux Zooms were around. 25-250 and 17 -100 ?.

Then a range of anamorphics - (Think of ' Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid' and many others)
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:11 PM

Nick just out of interest why did you quote " Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid " in ref to anamorphics ?
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#5 Nick G Smith

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 01:38 PM

Nick just out of interest why did you quote " Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid " in ref to anamorphics ?


No particular reason. I was just trying to think of anamorphic films from the '70s and 'Pat Garrett...' being one of my favourite westerns came to mind. I have no idea what lenses it was shot with but was most probably a Panavision shoot.
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#6 John Holland

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:03 PM

Well i agree its a great western . yes Panavision so "C" lenses and shot by a british cameraman .
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:59 PM

As Max stated the Zeiss Superspeeds were introduced in the late '70s. A good history of Zeiss lenses at cinematechnic.com.

The Canon K35 lenses were introduced around 1977-78 and maybe the Kowa primes around the same time.


Since 'Taxi Driver' used the Zeiss Superspeeds, early to mid70s. The Canons about the same time.
Kowas were early 70s, if not late 60s.

Lens mounts would have been BNCR, Arri bayonet and standard. Arri introduced the PL mount with the 35BL2 or 3 most probably mid to late '70s.


PL mount came out around 1983. The 35BL3 initially had the bayonet mount.


Also the Angenieux Zooms were around. 25-250 and 17 -100 ?.


It was a 20-120mm zoom. Came out at the same time as the Cooke. 70 or 71

Then a range of anamorphics - (Think of ' Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid' and many others)


Obviously there were Panavision anamorphots. Also Todd-AO 35. CP brought out The High Speed ones
using the Canon high speeds in the very late 70s.
Technovision cmae out in the late 70s on 'Apocolypse Now' and 'The Black Hole'. Initially Leonetti was handling them.

You missed the Panavision sphericals. They came out around 1970 because the PSR camera was so popular and stylish.
Looking at the focal lengths and slow T-stops of the wide angles in the first batches, one can get the impression some of them were rehosed still lenses.
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#8 Nick G Smith

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 01:25 PM

Leo, Forgive me for my errors, I was only a kid at the time.
You should do a FAQ on the history of lenses.
Do you know what year Zeiss started the T* coating?

The earliest Canon K35 serial No.s I've seen are from 1978 - I have a Canon still lens brochure from 1971 and the only fast lens is the 1.2 55mm FD. But mind you John Alcott used them on parts of 'Barry Lyndon' and that was 1974-75.
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