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Can I get a little feedback?


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#1 Keith Langsdorf

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 11:30 AM

Ok, so I finally got my act together and finished my demo reel (I think). Can I get some feedback?

http://www.shrieking.../demo_reel.html

The website is still a little ugly, so please disregard that; I'm just interested in community feedback on the work. Also, this is my editing AND cinematography reel, so I'll takes critiques on both!

Thanks a lot!
-Keith Langsdorf

Edited by Keith Langsdorf, 21 April 2008 - 11:34 AM.

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#2 Mark Williams

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 01:49 PM

Ok, so I finally got my act together and finished my demo reel (I think). Can I get some feedback?

http://www.shrieking.../demo_reel.html

The website is still a little ugly, so please disregard that; I'm just interested in community feedback on the work. Also, this is my editing AND cinematography reel, so I'll takes critiques on both!

Thanks a lot!
-Keith Langsdorf


Hi Keith

first of all this is my opinion others may see more into your work than me. To me cinematography is about lighting composition and colour. A lot of shots seemed overexposed with flat lighting almost as if there was none? I'd do something different and put more thoughts into this area and create some shots that are more original? I think also a change of soundtrack would help to.
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#3 Keith Langsdorf

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 01:59 PM

Hi Keith

first of all this is my opinion others may see more into your work than me. To me cinematography is about lighting composition and colour. A lot of shots seemed overexposed with flat lighting almost as if there was none? I'd do something different and put more thoughts into this area and create some shots that are more original? I think also a change of soundtrack would help to.


First off, thanks for your input. But to clarify, a lot of that "hyper-low-key" style was added in post, it's an aesthetic that I personally like. On the flip side, if it comes across poorly to prospective employers, I'll have to address it.

Second, can you clarify what is unoriginal about the shots?

Thanks a lot, your feedback is appreciated!
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#4 Mark Williams

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:14 PM

First off, thanks for your input. But to clarify, a lot of that "hyper-low-key" style was added in post, it's an aesthetic that I personally like. On the flip side, if it comes across poorly to prospective employers, I'll have to address it.

Second, can you clarify what is unoriginal about the shots?

Thanks a lot, your feedback is appreciated!


Hi Keith Yes I thought the smoking scenes have been done and better so many times as a demo. Dont let me put you off though Others will see things differently.
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#5 Dax McKeever

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:33 PM

Ok, so I finally got my act together and finished my demo reel (I think). Can I get some feedback?

http://www.shrieking.../demo_reel.html

The website is still a little ugly, so please disregard that; I'm just interested in community feedback on the work. Also, this is my editing AND cinematography reel, so I'll takes critiques on both!

Thanks a lot!
-Keith Langsdorf



Hi Keith. I'm just giving my FYI: You lost my attention with each scene change. How is each scene connected, each character related? The night time when a car arrives, and change to daytime, is unexplainable to. To be straightforward, there is no story if there is no transformation from one scene to another to keep the story going.
As for Mark's advice about changing the sound? If the story changes [from good to bad, to badder, to worse; or vice versa] then you can change sound to show change of emotion. But like a writer, or director, or actor, or cinematographer who each tells his individual story with the skills he has, there is no story told here.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 07:57 PM

Hi Keith. I'm just giving my FYI: You lost my attention with each scene change. How is each scene connected, each character related? The night time when a car arrives, and change to daytime, is unexplainable to. To be straightforward, there is no story if there is no transformation from one scene to another to keep the story going.
As for Mark's advice about changing the sound? If the story changes [from good to bad, to badder, to worse; or vice versa] then you can change sound to show change of emotion. But like a writer, or director, or actor, or cinematographer who each tells his individual story with the skills he has, there is no story told here.


It's a cinematography reel, not a movie trailer! Story has nothing to do with it. In fact, there shouldn't even be a story to distract the viewer from what you want them to notice, which is the unique qualities of your photography.

To that end, there are some cool shots and interesting looks, but the whole thing needs to be tightened up. Many shots are on the screen far too long. Put it up there long enough for the viewer to see it, and move on. Also, don't repeat similar shots. If we've seen one closeup of a guy with a moustache against a blow-out sky, we don't need to see it a second and third time. Focus on the shots that show something visually interesting like composition, lighting, or camera movement, and don't get caught up with the content. Some shots need to go -- the traveling MCU of the guy picking up the gun off the table didn't do anything for me visually, but the CU of putting the gun back on the table did.

There's some nice-looking stuff. Cut it down into a more stimulating montage by focusing on the most graphically strong images.
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#7 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:36 AM

Yes, good points above. Some nice shots but take another swing at editing it.


A general comment is that I've learned that many potential employers are impatient (or busy?) and thus go with your best stuff first and do your best to
GRAB their attention immediately and hold it for as long as you can and then cut out and leave them wanting more. If you use your "okay" stuff to save the best for last, your potential employer may click off and not ever see it.
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#8 Keith Langsdorf

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 09:29 AM

It's a cinematography reel, not a movie trailer! Story has nothing to do with it. In fact, there shouldn't even be a story to distract the viewer from what you want them to notice, which is the unique qualities of your photography.

To that end, there are some cool shots and interesting looks, but the whole thing needs to be tightened up. Many shots are on the screen far too long. Put it up there long enough for the viewer to see it, and move on. Also, don't repeat similar shots. If we've seen one closeup of a guy with a moustache against a blow-out sky, we don't need to see it a second and third time. Focus on the shots that show something visually interesting like composition, lighting, or camera movement, and don't get caught up with the content. Some shots need to go -- the traveling MCU of the guy picking up the gun off the table didn't do anything for me visually, but the CU of putting the gun back on the table did.

There's some nice-looking stuff. Cut it down into a more stimulating montage by focusing on the most graphically strong images.



That's pretty much what I expected to hear... As of now, it's sort of an editing/cinematography reel, and I know that it definately needs to be split apart into two more coherent reels.

Thanks a lot for the feedback.

Back to the drawingboard.
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#9 Keith Langsdorf

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 09:31 AM

Yes, good points above. Some nice shots but take another swing at editing it.


A general comment is that I've learned that many potential employers are impatient (or busy?) and thus go with your best stuff first and do your best to
GRAB their attention immediately and hold it for as long as you can and then cut out and leave them wanting more. If you use your "okay" stuff to save the best for last, your potential employer may click off and not ever see it.



Thanks for the advice. I agree wholeheartedly, but this being my first attempt at a reel, it's a bit rough.

But not for long.....
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Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

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