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#1 Tim Partridge

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 06:34 PM

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#2 Niki Mundo

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 08:42 PM

I GOT THIS OFF LA CRAIGSLIST>CREW. IT'S ALL IN CAPS AND IS QUITE FUNNY. BE PREPARED TO DONATE YOUR 35MM EQUIPMENT AND LIVE IN A VAN OR A BUS! NO PAY!





EXPERT TOP NOTCH PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTION CREW NEEDED

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reply to: see below
Date: 2008-04-22, 6:17PM PDT


HELLO
WE ARE A FIRST TIME PRODUCTION TEAM LOOKING FOR A TOP NOTCH PROFESSIONAL FILM CREW.
WE HAVE A 200 PAGE SCRIPT WITH A GREAT CAST. IT IS A ROAD TRIP MOIVE FROM COAST TO COAST. AND ONLY 18 DAYS TO SHOOT IT. IT WILL BE A VERY DEMANDING AND BUSY SCHEDULE. WE HAVE A VERY LIMITED BUDGET AND CAN NOT PAY ANY ONE UP FRONT. WE OFFER COPY AND CREDT. WE WILL BE SLEEPING IN VANS AND BUSES. THIS IS BECAUSE OF THE SUBJECT MATER OF THE MOVIE. THIS IS VERY RUN AND GUN. WE ARE LOOKING FOR CREW WITH AT LEAST 10 YEARS AND OR 20 PLUS IMDB CONFIRMED CREDITS. WE WILL NEED AT LEAST 3 PERSONAL REFERENCES FROM EITHER DIRECTORS OR PRODUCERS. WE WILL CHECK. WE ARE SHOOTING ON 35MM. LOOKING FOR PEOPLE DONATE THIER GEAR TO CAUSE.
THIS A LABOR OF LOVE.
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY.
NON PAYING--NON PAYING NON PAYING.
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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 09:43 PM

Not sure of the relevance to that Craig's list post to the topic of this thread, but.....that is one of the most hilarious film job postings I've ever seen. We should put that one in the Hall Of Fame.

R,
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#4 Frank Barrera

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 11:45 PM

post #1 and post #2 have nothing to do with each other
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 12:22 AM

There have been some stories (a few recounted here) about how finicky Stallone can be, but it's mostly to do with vanity and what's his good side and how he personally likes to be lit. I've never heard about this "ghost director" theory though. I suppose on occasion an actor/producer would try to maintain creative control over their "baby".

What also comes to mind is the story of Kirk Douglas and Kubrick on Spartacus. Having already collaborated with Kubrick on "Paths of Glory", Douglas thought he could bring in Kubrick (after the original director was fired) and could manipulate him into going the direction Douglas saw fit. We all know how quickly that thinking was probably thrown out the window.
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#6 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 04:24 AM

It is well known that on RAMBO III a visual stylist, director Russell Mulcahy was fired and replaced by Peter McDonald, second unit director/cameraman on RAMBO II. "Creative differences"...



Wow - i hadnt heard that. how far into production was Mulcahy fired? I've always had a soft spot for Rambo 3!!!
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#7 Rupe Whiteman

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 11:38 AM

'Russell and 'Stallone.... what great contributors to the art of film-making... Naaat as Borat would say.

- My guess is that the kind of directors that turn up for these gigs are well aware of the intentions of the 'Stars'... keep your head down and take the money and try not to get fired... and get a tan if you're shooting somewhere nice...
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#8 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 04:23 AM

I have no idea about how far it was before Mulcahy jumped ship. Also, is it just me, or is RAMBO III the only film in history to list a DP (John Stanier) with GBCT (Guild of British Camera Technicians) after his name? I would love to know why the DP or his agent felt the need to list that.


Was Peter MacDonald Lighting the movie for Mulcahy when he got fired?
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#9 Will Earl

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 07:14 AM

Haven't heard of any actors 'ghost' directing, but stories of films being directed "by-commitee" or the directors role being more akin to that of a director working on a tv series are not uncommon - where the director is more of a technician. The job still being the same, but they aren't the driving creative force behind the film and will often not have much say on big decisions affecting the film.

If your looking for specific films - American History X and Riverqueen are two examples that I can think of where the 'creative differences' between the actor and director caused some controversy.
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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 10:58 AM

What also comes to mind is the story of Kirk Douglas and Kubrick on Spartacus. Having already collaborated with Kubrick on "Paths of Glory", Douglas thought he could bring in Kubrick (after the original director was fired) and could manipulate him into going the direction Douglas saw fit. We all know how quickly that thinking was probably thrown out the window.


The crazy thing about that was that he fired Anthony Mann! He later referred to Kubrick as 'a talented poop' which tells us something else about his artistic sense.
Kubrick also lit most of 'Spartacus' after objecting to Russell Metty's bland style. Apparently.
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#11 Mark Dunn

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 11:01 AM

Oh dear, I've been auto-censored. This recently happened to my OH when she tried to list a recipe for cock-a-leekie soup on a diet board.
(If it gets censored, the word is a four-letter one describing a male chicken).
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#12 John Holland

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 11:03 AM

I really dont think Kubrick lit anything on"Spartacus " it has the awful blandness look of all Russell Mettys colour work , ie brute or 10 k next to the camera.
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#13 Rupe Whiteman

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 02:34 PM

If my memory is right... Douglas was a producer on 'Spartacus' and brought in Kubrick because of his fantastic direction on Paths of Glory. I doubt very much that he ever thought that he could manipulate Kubrick (who could!). Douglas just knew he could deliver... and he did.
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#14 Mike Williamson

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 03:38 PM

I really dont think Kubrick lit anything on"Spartacus " it has the awful blandness look of all Russell Mettys colour work , ie brute or 10 k next to the camera.


That's a bit harsh. I thought Metty did some interesting work for Douglas Sirk on "All That Heaven Allows" and "Written on the Wind". Maybe I feel the need to defend him because he shot "Touch of Evil" (my favorite film), but I think it's an overstatement to say that all his color films are awful.
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#15 Ignacio Aguilar

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 12:51 PM

As far as I know McDonald was originally second unit DP/Director on RAMBO III, just as he was on RAMBO II. Besides, Stanier had been lighting Hollywood movies for four years before RAMBO III (including OXFORD BLUES and DEATH WISH 3).


Thanks to Blu-ray, these days I've been rewatching the original Rambo trilogy. I had never seen "Rambo III" before and it's not a good film by any means, but the cinematography is outstanding at times, particularly the aerial attack at the Afghan village and Stallone's night assault to the Russian's fortress. Don't know if Stanier was such a good cinematographer (I had only seen before some films he operated for) or MacDonald was really involved as well on the visuals, but whoever is responsible gave the movie some great images. Plus I miss this kind of organic look (JDC anamorphics) and the lack of digital effects for action movies, which almost gives "Rambo III" a classic feel, as it places it in the old-fashioned way of filmaking.
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