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Kodak 7229


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#1 Dustin Skrabek

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 10:35 AM

Hi all,

I've been browsing these forums for a relatively short amount of time but have found them extremely helpful over the last few months and look forward to using this site as a great reference in the future.

Introductions aside I am currently involved with a student film of which I will be shooting in august on 16mm. With my own classes I won't be able to shoot any tests for at least another 2-3weeks, I've been considering Kodak's 7229 stock but have found very little actual images/stills or clips of this stock. I read through Eric Steelberg's posts regarding his work on JUNO and from what he described he shot on this stock (obviously 5229) as well as another. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this stock or know of any movies/pictures for visual reference?

Thanks !
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 02:59 PM

Kodak Hollywood has monthly demo screenings of their film products:

http://www.kodak.com...news/demo.jhtml
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#3 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:10 PM

The best thing to do is get a test role of it and shoot some test footage. You'll find that the 29 is noticeably grainier than the 18 but does have a softer color rendition and sees a bit deeper into the shadows. If the grain is too much you may want to consider Fuji Eterna 500 which has the grain of 18 but is a little softer like the 29....it's actually somewhere between the 18 and 29.

I find the Kodak screenings not very helpful, especially for students/indie filmmakers, because they are usually shot with Primo lenses or similarly higher end lenses which students/indie films can rarely afford...and the lenses are a large part of how a film stock can look. So it's best to just get some film and shoot with the camera/lens you'd use. The look of JUNO, for instance, came just as much from the 29 as it did the special set of low contrast lenses Panavision assembled.
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 04:59 PM

Hi all,

I've been browsing these forums for a relatively short amount of time but have found them extremely helpful over the last few months and look forward to using this site as a great reference in the future.

Introductions aside I am currently involved with a student film of which I will be shooting in august on 16mm. With my own classes I won't be able to shoot any tests for at least another 2-3weeks, I've been considering Kodak's 7229 stock but have found very little actual images/stills or clips of this stock. I read through Eric Steelberg's posts regarding his work on JUNO and from what he described he shot on this stock (obviously 5229) as well as another. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this stock or know of any movies/pictures for visual reference?

Thanks !



Half Nelson was shot on that very stock. Give that a look. I thought it looked rather fantastic, grainy yes, but pleasing overall.
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#5 Dustin Skrabek

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 09:11 PM

Thanks for the insight and suggestions Eric, I'll definitely look into the 18 and Fuji. I'll be trying to swindle a deal for some short-ends this coming week and hopefully shoot some tests next weekend.

......Thanks Chris I've had Half Nelson on my Netflix for a long time now but unfortunately it kept getting pushed back, I'll be moving that up for sure now.
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#6 Mike Williamson

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:24 AM

Hey Dustin, I think Eric has the best advice which is to shoot a test with the lenses that you'll be using and see what you think. If you do get to test, I would recommend testing Eterna 500 or 7218 as well so that you have a comparison. You learn a lot from testing, including how and what to test, so this would be a good opportunity to look at some different stocks.

Personally, I feel that '29 is too grainy in 16mm for most projects, certainly there's some films out there where it would be the right look but you'd have to want the grain. If you're going to finish the project on video, I think you'd be better off shooting Eterna 500 (or 7218 as a second choice) and lowering the contrast and color saturation in telecine. That's especially true if you're using older lenses, doubly true if it's an old zoom.
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#7 Dustin Skrabek

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 09:44 PM

Hey Dustin, I think Eric has the best advice which is to shoot a test with the lenses that you'll be using and see what you think. If you do get to test, I would recommend testing Eterna 500 or 7218 as well so that you have a comparison. You learn a lot from testing, including how and what to test, so this would be a good opportunity to look at some different stocks.

Personally, I feel that '29 is too grainy in 16mm for most projects, certainly there's some films out there where it would be the right look but you'd have to want the grain. If you're going to finish the project on video, I think you'd be better off shooting Eterna 500 (or 7218 as a second choice) and lowering the contrast and color saturation in telecine. That's especially true if you're using older lenses, doubly true if it's an old zoom.


Thanks Mike, that makes a lot of sense. I actually ran into a rep from Fuji while I was down at the New Port Film Festival this weekend and got to talking and working on getting some Fuji test stock this week and I'll defiantly look into the 500.
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