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craigslist is pointless


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#1 Niki Mundo

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 04:49 PM

So I've been emailing crew posting on craigslist since I arrived in L.A., everything and anything production assistant. The one's with that pay a little and seem professional never email me back and the only two have responded. One for a roger corman-type B company which lisitng "Distribution/Marketing assistant" which was bascially me sitting in a room with other interns chasing people around on myspace trying to get them to buy DVD's and t-shirts. Telemarketing is what it was, and they didn't want to pay for the that and it was a dead end job. So why bother..
The last one was today meeting with a production manager (big fat slob of a lady chainsmoking and showing up in a dirty chyrsler sebring) who got all mad at me about not reading the script she sent me yesterday. She was all excited about her project but all I could think about was how repulsive she looked and acted. And this shoot is for about a month and doesn't seem very professional and doesn't pay.

FINE.

I have six months in seed money here in L.A. and i'm gonna burn it all up helping morons achieve their prosumer video dreams.

No more internet, I'm going to go around to real companies like Panavision, Village roadshow and get ignored and laughed at.
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 05:00 PM

You're selling yourself, and sales is a numbers game. It takes a certain number of "no" answers to get one "yes." And it's a BIG number at first. With time you learn how to better qualify your prospects to increase your percentages.

Keep at it.
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#3 Dax McKeever

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 05:48 PM

So I've been emailing crew posting on craigslist since I arrived in L.A., everything and anything production assistant. The one's with that pay a little and seem professional never email me back and the only two have responded. One for a roger corman-type B company which lisitng "Distribution/Marketing assistant" which was bascially me sitting in a room with other interns chasing people around on myspace trying to get them to buy DVD's and t-shirts. Telemarketing is what it was, and they didn't want to pay for the that and it was a dead end job. So why bother..
The last one was today meeting with a production manager (big fat slob of a lady chainsmoking and showing up in a dirty chyrsler sebring) who got all mad at me about not reading the script she sent me yesterday. She was all excited about her project but all I could think about was how repulsive she looked and acted. And this shoot is for about a month and doesn't seem very professional and doesn't pay.

FINE.

I have six months in seed money here in L.A. and i'm gonna burn it all up helping morons achieve their prosumer video dreams.

No more internet, I'm going to go around to real companies like Panavision, Village roadshow and get ignored and laughed at.




They say it takes 7 years to find decent work. Have you heard this yet? If not, or if you are not hearing critical truths, then you are dealing with amateur morons who still live in "Hollywood dream world". Here's my story:
I NEVER HAD PLANS TO GO HOLLYWOOD, AT FIRST, but then a friend invited me to move to Hollywood with her. I arrived in 2003, and started exactly like you: searching internet for DECENT, QUALITY WORK; and willing to work as non-paid intern. Unfortunately the business and the city of LA is filled with scam artists, and filmmakers, who will take advantage of free-labor from naive, new arrivals like yourself. To make a long story short, IT TOOK ME FIVE YEARS [UNTIL 2008], by which time I had been able to meet many professionals [even legendary, award-winners] and I managed to find limited opportunity to add to my resume. None of the 'big names' I met offered me work, nor referrals, nor assistance to find either. Why? Because it is a game of survival. If you can survive [and when your hairs turn grey] then they will assume you are serious, and willing to work for good projects, at good pay.
:huh:
I MEAN THIS, NO BULL. When I first arrived, in 2003, I said "not me, I'm better, smarter, schooled, and will be more successful". But this is what everyone says; including the morons. So 2 months ago in Feb. 2008, I said ENOUGH IS ENOUGH. I left LA and returned home to the east coast. Now I am finding my wisdom & intelligence, which I lost while surviving in LA.

MY NEXT RECOMMENDATION: ASK FOR REFERRALS, ASK FOR REFERRALS, ASK FOR REFERRALS. :o
Do not waste time on CraigsList. Do you really think anything decent is going to offer Hollywood Film Employment on that site? You will be amazed and what you 'thought you knew' before you went to LA. Oh yea, TRUST VERY FEW. IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD, IT PROBABLY IS, BUT ALWAYS FOLLOWUP WITH DETAILS [b/c you never know for sure].

Where do you live? Avoid Hollywood area for residency. There are many production companies there, but unless you work for them, it is a very stressful atmosphere to live in. I recommend, Santa Monica, Venice, Studio City, Pasadena, Feliz or Glenwood area. Honestly, it is a crapp shoot and what you will find & enjoy. I think those areas are more relaxing to meet people, enjoy a good night's rest, and make friends.
;)
Further Questions? Add me as FriendList and I will inform you of more stories, places to go, etc. Honestly, though, it will literally take you 4-6 years minimum of residency in LA before you will find entry level at 7 years. Why? The well-known professionals, who live there, are well aware that amateurs arrive with 'hollywood dreams' and many are quick to return home when times get tough. LET ME REPEAT: I WAS THERE 2003-2008, FIVE YEARS, UNTIL I WISED UP TO LEAVE. It's a game of russian roulet: some get lucky, some die, and some are [couragous] cowards who know when to leave the playing table.
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:14 PM

Dax, I'm sorry you had such a tough time of it, but the one thing I noticed was missing from your story is what skill or service you brought to the game. You get hired because of what you can do for someone. No one's going to give you a job just being a "body" in the office or on set -- you have to have something to offer if your want gainful employment in return. Maybe you just omitted it from your post, but I think it's a detail worth pointing out to people in Niki's position.

Offering to do "anything" just tells your employer that you have you have nothing special to offer. Even if you are willing to do anything, take any job, you still have to convince your prospect that you have what they need. A "survivor" with a head full of gray hair isn't going to be given a job unless he has a skill to offer. The more skills you have the more points of entry you'll have. The better your skill, the farther you'll go in any endeavor by beating out the competition.

Niki; Brush up on your skills. Take some classes. Go out there and create some demo or reference material for whatever it is that you want to do. It's not about what you get, it's about what you give that defines success. Give first, and you'll "get" in return.
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#5 Tom Lowe

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 08:22 PM

No offense, but with the attitude you're displaying here, you're only hurting yourself. Funny that other people can just basically wander onto an indie set off a craigslist ad, and six months later they have a fulltime gig on a TV show and enough indie work that they are constantly turning stuff down. It's all about hard work and getting along with people. If you're posting about what a fatass slob the PM was, I'd say you're not ready for this.

Edited by Tom Lowe, 24 April 2008 - 08:22 PM.

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#6 John Brawley

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 07:17 AM

No more internet, I'm going to go around to real companies like Panavision, Village roadshow and get ignored and laughed at.


You've listed a camera rental company and a distributor ?

If you can get a gig at panavision (or any rental company) that would have to be a good start. At a rental company you'll get to meet some of your future employers, who may notice your caring and diligent attitude. You'll also get to know the gear and how to handle it. And you'll have a job.

My first real job after 2 years of volunteer work was at a rental company. I was there for 5 years in various positions, before I left to go freelance.

jb
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#7 Will Earl

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 07:45 AM

Following on from what Tom just said. If you get sent stuff like scripts by production companies then try read them, even if you only get half way through. Also try and find out whatever information you can about the employer - if they have a website for their film, visit it. Google the names of the people involved, see what films they've worked on.

Despite appearances - this PM or (any of the crew working on the film) could have worked on a number of major features, unless you do a bit of research you won't know for sure.
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#8 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 08:45 AM

I wouldn't worry how people look, some of the best people won't pass mustard in the looks department. Just as the hip trendy people aren't always the talented people with all the connections. Unless you're very lucky, with friends and family in the business, it'll take time to get established.
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#9 Niki Mundo

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:19 PM

I'm gonna get a regular job here in L.A. (like at Arby's) and then self-finance my own films like the "$30 film school guy",Mark Pirro,Rick Scmidt "films at used car prices" after a year or two I'll start making enough that I can do my own tromo pictures thing (I've been studying indie distribution models and I can make money..). And maybe put my profits into other people's projects.
I'm too NuHollywood to take orders from subprime productions.. the only stuff I like anyways are indie films and PBS. And you guys.

It's never been easier to make and distribute your own stuff. I'm here in L.A. which has an abundance of talent, crew, equipment and labs. That's what I'm gonna do.


And I'll PAY people working on my film(s) from my Arby's wages..
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#10 Scott Bryant

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:24 PM

Hmm problem solved.
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#11 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 04:34 PM

Is there anything that can't be remedied by having a job at Arby's?

I tell ya
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#12 Gus Sacks

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 05:00 PM

Errrr, Craigslist was the bulk of my career about a year ago. And honestly gave me the kick-start I needed to be self-sustaining.

I guess it doesn't work for everyone?
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#13 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 05:17 PM

I get some stuff some from CL here and there. It just depends on what the shoot is and what the pay is overall; ya know. Like everything in this business the jobs you get can be touch and go for awhile while you're working you way in (not that I am by any measure in the industry, but i get a check here and again, which I can't complain 'bout)
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#14 Rich Hibner

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 05:31 PM

Try Mandy.com
I live here in FLA and seem to find some decent work.
Whether it be PA or AC, it helps me find people in the business.
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#15 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 01:16 AM

It's never been easier to make and distribute your own stuff. I'm here in L.A. which has an abundance of talent, crew, equipment and labs. That's what I'm gonna do.


This is true. It's also never been harder to distinguish yourself from all of the other (mostly crappy) films being self-distributed or sent to festivals.
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#16 Niki Mundo

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 03:04 PM

Alright. I'm going to hit the bricks next week and go to door-door physical places.

Thanks for the replies.
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#17 Rich Hibner

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 03:39 PM

Alright. I'm going to hit the bricks next week and go to door-door physical places.

Thanks for the replies.


Become a Scientologist. You'll have a shot then.
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#18 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 08:51 PM

I've gotten quite a few good gigs through CL up here in the SF Bay Area. Sure, there are always a lot who just want free labor & equipment and not necessarily skilled technicians. But you just gotta weed through those. CL is still very much worth checking out from time to time.

But if you're posting to crew your own film, you have to be very careful and detailed with what you're looking for. Don't write things like "Must own 3-chip camera", or "no flakes" and don't try to instill some type of authoratative tone in your posting, HUGE turn-off.

:)
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#19 Greg Traw

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:18 PM

Working at Arby's and self-financing films??? You could do that up in Seattle... well, Starbuck's instead of Arby's? Lattes have to be better than roast beef any day; on top of that, you'd be working with a bunch of other broke filmmakers, artists and budding musicians (aka the cult of the barista)...
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#20 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:42 AM

Hell if you worked at starbucks you'd not only get a sweet deal for coffee on set, but medical benefits for yourself! You can train to be a "partner asset!"
and then deal with people like me who spent so much time there grumbling in the past that they no longer feel "right," charging me for my Americanos. ... mmmmm...
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