Jump to content


Photo

Getting the best out...


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Miguel Bunster

Miguel Bunster
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 301 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 April 2008 - 12:29 AM

So I will go in camera-film-DI testing in a few days and will test a lot of things in only two days.

I am planning a couple things to test the DI workflow and get a short selected print and HDCAM And HDVPRO results of the tests (only 1 or 2 minutes for film out sadley but its what it is) to view and show.

Now what you guys think would be the best way to put to test the DI workflow and just go hard on it?

I am planning a few different things but becasue I can print only 1 to 2 minutes out and get it projected here in town it would be grat to get some thoughts on charts, extreme sutuations, exposures, color etc. All form the tech point of view. The n the rest of the testing will more artistic things and so on.

THanks a lot!
M
  • 0

#2 tylerhawes

tylerhawes
  • Guests

Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:09 PM

Make sure you get to drive a color session with a colorist and see how they are to work with, what they can do with your footage. Are they story tellers who find a way of relating the color look to what is happening to the characters and the context of the narrative? Do they have insightful suggestions? Do they recognize the things in the frame that are distracting from where you should be looking and know how to fix them? The colorist' knowledge will be most crucial and if it isn't impressive than the rest is a non-starter.

I'd forget charts and just use good footage and trust your eyes.

You want to make sure that the color suite can match the look of the printed film and that you can grade there with confidence of how it will translate. Push some images to some aggressive places and see how they translate.

Make some deep blacks but without crushing, and see how well they can hold the shadow detail of that on the film print (or do they loose it on the print?). If the shadows become muddy (or worse, get washed out) than the anchor of the image has been lost. You have to be able to rely on this.

When you go for a poppy-saturated look in the DI suite, are those colors quickly creeping in and becoming gaudy? Pay particular attention to highly saturated colors, especially red, magenta and neon greens. Maybe leave some shots graded that way and see how they disappear on the film print, but realize you'll be stuck with them in the digital print if that's what you're seeing in the DI suite (and that it is a case of not being able to match the print in the DI suite).
  • 0

#3 Miguel Bunster

Miguel Bunster
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 301 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 April 2008 - 11:57 PM

Good thoughts, had siilar things in mind specially a black light gag we have which i will test and a lot of snow at night.
thanks and best
M
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Opal

Visual Products

Abel Cine

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

The Slider

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

CineLab