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#1 ashraf islahuddin

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 09:01 AM

Hi ,i have a small shoot coming up.The work is suppose to be done on super16.I will be shooting shooting in lounge and waiting area of the airport in the evening,i don't have time to test anything ,what should i keep in mind as not too regret later?
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:36 AM

Well, make sure to bring your light meter.
If you get a chance to, take your meter out and see what kind of exposures you're looking at in your locations, just so you know from where to start and then you can build your lighting there.
Also, get in there and try to find power to help for the lights you do bring in later on.
And remember, airports are generally pretty secure, so if you left it in the truck, it might be awhile before you can get to and from the truck, ya know?
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#3 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:40 AM

what is the place like? will you work with natural light? are there any windows in the background? i have been shooting on an airport too and i had quiet a problem with the ratio because there was a huge window in the background and i had to light a lot in the interior, otherwise the highlights in the background would have been blown out.
usually there are a lot of practicals in airports like flourescent lights, mind your frame rate and power frecuency to avoid flicker too...
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#4 ashraf islahuddin

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:57 PM

what is the place like? will you work with natural light? are there any windows in the background? i have been shooting on an airport too and i had quiet a problem with the ratio because there was a huge window in the background and i had to light a lot in the interior, otherwise the highlights in the background would have been blown out.
usually there are a lot of practicals in airports like flourescent lights, mind your frame rate and power frecuency to avoid flicker too...


Hi Tebbe,
Yes there are a lot of florescent fixture and I am mostly shooting in the evening,frame rate and power frequency is my main concern.Cpold you suggest me something on that?
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 11:18 PM

To avoid flicker with 50Hz. lighting you need to shoot 24fps at with a 172.8 degree shutter angle, or shoot 25 fps with a 180 degree shutterangle. If it's 60 Hz. lighting you should be safe at 24fps and 180 degrees.
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#6 ashraf islahuddin

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 08:30 AM

To avoid flicker with 50Hz. lighting you need to shoot 24fps at with a 172.8 degree shutter angle, or shoot 25 fps with a 180 degree shutterangle. If it's 60 Hz. lighting you should be safe at 24fps and 180 degrees.


Thanks Michael
will keep all that in mind.
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