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Good Point and shoot for 250 D


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#1 Ted Hinkle

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 11:35 AM

What's a good point and shoot Super 8 camera for using 250 D?
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#2 Ted Hinkle

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 11:59 PM

Well in my own research I came across a couple of cameras. Nikon 8X super Zoom and the Canon 518 SV. Both seem super easy to use and they accept 250 Daylight cartridges. Any others out there?
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 02 May 2008 - 04:50 PM

I think my Sankyo CME 1100 meters 250D, I'll have to check. :)
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 04:35 AM

How do they notch it? That's the first thing you need to know.

The only way it would make sense under the SMPTE super 8 protocol would be speed notching it at 400T/250D, and then providing it in a notchless cartridge to push the filter pin in. But I don't know of a point-and shoot that would read that ASA speed-- the recommendations here are good and some other older cameras will read these films speeds too, as well as newer advanced ones, but none of them are point and shoot.

Simpler cameras at best will read it at ASA 160 with the filter switch at tungsten (no filter) but that's still almost a full stop overexposed.
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#5 Jim Carlile

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 05:09 AM

P.S, Thought about it some more-- if you make sure there's a filter notch in the cartridge the Canon 310XL will run it fine-- just keep the filter switch at 'bulb.' That camera's pretty point-and -shoot.

If there's too much light put a 4X ND filter over the lens and pull up the red stop over the meter window, to cut down the light.
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#6 Ted Hinkle

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 02:07 PM

One of the reason's I'm looking for a "point and shoot" is that I'm trying to help my customers generate more interest in Super 8mm. These are customers who have no experience what super 8 is or how to use it. So I'm looking for cameras that basically anybody can pick up and start using with little or no knowledge. I plan on creating a simple "how to use" booklet that will give them some direction without complicating things to much. While notch filters and modifications might work for some applications, for this I'm just trying to keep it as simple as possible. The reason why I wanted a camera that would shoot (250 Daylight) negative is that in my experience with this format I've been able to get some very good results, I think mostly because it seems to be very forgiving in a sense that it gives you seven stops of lattitude. The idea is for some one with little or no knowledge to go out and shoot something and to look at it (while it might not be perfect from a professionals standpoint) and say "cool, I shot that". So while I'm pretty confident with the way I'm going to do it, I think it interesting to see how others would handle it... what types of cameras and films stock they would use to give to an unexperienced person. I'm open to any suggestions.
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#7 Chris Burke

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 04:49 PM

One of the reason's I'm looking for a "point and shoot" is that I'm trying to help my customers generate more interest in Super 8mm. These are customers who have no experience what super 8 is or how to use it. So I'm looking for cameras that basically anybody can pick up and start using with little or no knowledge. I plan on creating a simple "how to use" booklet that will give them some direction without complicating things to much. While notch filters and modifications might work for some applications, for this I'm just trying to keep it as simple as possible. The reason why I wanted a camera that would shoot (250 Daylight) negative is that in my experience with this format I've been able to get some very good results, I think mostly because it seems to be very forgiving in a sense that it gives you seven stops of lattitude. The idea is for some one with little or no knowledge to go out and shoot something and to look at it (while it might not be perfect from a professionals standpoint) and say "cool, I shot that". So while I'm pretty confident with the way I'm going to do it, I think it interesting to see how others would handle it... what types of cameras and films stock they would use to give to an unexperienced person. I'm open to any suggestions.



have you contacted Pro8mm or Spectra? They might be able to make some suggestions. If a camera is reading a 250D negative as 160, then you couldn't ask for more. That is ideally where you would want to be in terms of exposure. I always use an external meter anyway, so I wouldn't know.

Where would you be sending your clients to get this 250 speed daylight super 8?
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#8 Jim Carlile

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 03:33 AM

yeah, it all depends upon how it's notched. If they set it for 250T/160D, which makes sense, then almost any camera will read it at 160. But if it's in a filter-notchless cartridge, then many cameras will set it to ASA 100-- long story as to why (cameras that will read the ASA 250 notch will almost always set the meter to ASA 160 as well if there's a notchless cartridge.)

Point and shoot cameras only read ASA 40 to 160, maybe a few others but never above 160, AFAIK, so this wouldn't be an issue.

Just make sure there's a filter notch, but I suspect with point and shoot cameras there's rarely an issue with this complicated notchless cartridge/filter pin/low ASA setting function. But always keep the filter switch at 'bulb' no matter what.

Edited by Jim Carlile, 06 May 2008 - 03:35 AM.

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