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Shooting Tungsten film outdoors without 85B


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#1 Kristian Schumacher

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 06:40 AM

Hi everyone,

I am making my first film using a combination of HDV, Fuji 8650/8630 shot with a K-3 in s-16, and one roll of Kodak 7218 regular-16 shot with a Milliken high speed camera.
For different reasons (forgetfulness being one of them;-) I have shot all the 16mm footage so far in sunlight with no filter. I have some more outdoor stuff to shoot, and thought I'd keep shooting without filter to make it all match.
This footage is for a music video that we'd like to have quite a desaturated, coldish look in the end.
But can anyone tell me (or better yet, show me...) just how blue and "off" such unfiltered footage will look? How easy/successful would it be to correct the colour back to normal balance in post? If needed, would it be better to ask for this colour correction from the processing/scanning company?
As a first-timer, I would really appreciate your views on this. Thanks,

Kristian
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 09:51 AM

Your decision to keep the filter off so that new footage will be consistent with what's already been shot is probably the correct one. The blue in the image will be pretty pronounced, but most of it can be taken out in post, or during the original telecine (unless, of course, you like the effect).
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#3 Kristian Schumacher

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 10:21 AM

Thanks for that,

Then I'll keep shooting in the same way and plan to fix it in post. And when desaturating, I guess that should reduce the tint a little.

Kristian
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 02:41 PM

It seems to me that negative tungsten film with no daylight filter is easier to re-color correct in post than reversal film tungsten shot with no daylight filter, especially if the transfer is being done in a high end transfer facility.
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#5 Kristian Schumacher

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 03:14 PM

Thanks Alessandro,

My film is all negative, so at least that makes me feel better. We'll see...

Kristian
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