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Rigging Lights from Ceiling


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#1 Sean McClellan

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 02:07 PM

Hello,

I am key grippng on a short film that is coming up soon and I am trying to figure out some ways to rig some lights to from the ceiling for our wide shots of the whole room. We cannot have anything in the shot so a terradactyl is out of the question. The biggest light that I would be using to rig would be a 650 watt light. Does anyone know some alternative ways or have any ideas on how I could rig some lights? The only thing that I could think of is using a 3 piece wall spreader. I don't want to use any baby nail-ons as they would leave holes in the ceiling. Any comments or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Also included are photos taken of the room.

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#2 robert duke

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 03:05 PM

A wall spreader is a good option for this room. the paneling won't suffer as drywall would. Also you might look into a Sparrow plate or a Putty knife. you may be able to slide them behind the paneling.

a Mathpole or Autopole is another good option. they can be snuck into a corner or used as a wall spreader.
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#3 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 04:20 PM

The ceiling looks so low, I would think any "movie lights" and rigging would be in the movie. As far as nail-on plates, you could fill the holes with spackle and paint over them. Does the production have a locations department? Maybe they can make an arrangement w/ the location owners.
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#4 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 07:19 PM

Another vote for a wall spreader, either 2x4 lumber or speed rail (round) type. Make sure you find a stud in the wall, is always best. I've always tried to stay away from pollcats/Mathpoles when possible -- they are generally less secure than a spreader, especially with long horizontal spans (and that room looks like a good 20' across -- not even sure if they make a pollcat that long -- robert? You might have to put in extension tubes from autopole; again, making things longer and possibly more "saggy").

As far as nailing or screwing anything, this is a great option if possible. Always ask the homeowner/house before you modify the location, in any way, even if it's a small hole, even if it can be easily repaired. Just because someone has the ability to putty something up, doesn't mean everyone is comfortable with making holes in their wall. Besides, those walls look like wood paneling (ie, painting over putty would not be the same as what's already there)

If all else fails, the other option, although less desirable it seems, is to make a small menace arm and keep the base close to camera.

Edited by Daniel Wallens, 05 May 2008 - 07:21 PM.

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#5 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 07:38 PM

A wall spreader is a good option for this room. the paneling won't suffer as drywall would. Also you might look into a Sparrow plate or a Putty knife. you may be able to slide them behind the paneling.

a Mathpole or Autopole is another good option. they can be snuck into a corner or used as a wall spreader.


Hi Robert,
I answered your PM, I just wasn't sure you got it.
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 08:53 PM

Have you considered Source Four's bounced off the ceiling? Standard bulb is a 750 watt which means you can run two S4's off a single 15amp residential circuit. If you use S4's be certain you get the regular 3200K bulbs, not the long life "X" series which are around 2800K.
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#7 timHealy

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 09:42 PM

I agree with Jon. Your ceiling is so low that if your characters walk around the room you'll see your lights.

Let me ask what time of day is your shoot?

If during the day you can easily pour light in from the windows. You can mimic sunlight or a large soft source coming in. Or both.

If a night shoot I would use a few practicals for your wideshot and then when lighting close ups you'll have plenty or room for lighting nicer close ups. You can boom in a back light too then if needed.

Hope that helps.

Best

Tim
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#8 Sean McClellan

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 09:49 PM

These shots are day shots and My DP wants to do some lighting setups for the wide shots. I do agree that the wall spreader is probably my best option as far as rigging the lights. I will check the owners and see if I can possibly mount some nail ons to the walls and ceiling. I appreciate everyone's input and I like all of the different ideas that you guys have come up with.


Thanks,

Sean McClellan
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#9 robert duke

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 11:09 PM

No pole cats and autopoles aren't for long horizontal spans. they do work great for vertical spans because they can squeeze tight into a corner or a place a stand will not fit.

Darryl, I got your PM as all plans of mice and men...
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