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#1 tony powell

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 04:29 PM

I am trying to get a film look using the JVC GY-110 HD camera and was wondering if you are able to use a low contrast filter in conjunction with a promist without any ill effects ?

Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 04:36 PM

Define 'Film Look' & 'Ill Effects'

A low contrast filter will give you a 'flatter image', but will have no effect on the actual latitude of the camera. A Pro-Mist will soften the picture, and, if it's a white pro-mist, raise the shadow areas a little.

What look are you trying to achieve?
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 11:24 PM

The best way to get a "film look" is to light it well. That will get you 99% there.
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#4 Ram Shani

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 02:00 AM

i agree with Chris. also composition will add to film look.

but there are a few things you can dowith camera. first try to work with the most open f/stop to get shallow DOF and use long and of the lens. (as much as you can)
i like to work with net behind the lens, (black 15denir) this will lower the detail and soft the pic. but to me it look like it affect more the out of focus area then the subject in focus.
one more thing work with camera progressive.

Edited by Ram Shani, 23 May 2008 - 02:04 AM.

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 11:22 AM

A ProMist already lowers contrast, so I wouldn't combine it with a LowCon filter. I'd just use one or the other.
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 02:49 PM

Filters and filter combinations are a matter of taste, and in video, they're cheap and easy to test. Go ahead and shoot every filter and combination you can think of, then look at the results both on typical TV sets and in a good front projection room. Slate carefully, keep plenty of notes.

Bottom line, as a cinematographer, you have to trust what you see, not what we write. ;-)



-- J.S.
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#7 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 05:41 PM

i agree with Chris. also composition will add to film look.

but there are a few things you can dowith camera. first try to work with the most open f/stop to get shallow DOF and use long and of the lens. (as much as you can)
i like to work with net behind the lens, (black 15denir) this will lower the detail and soft the pic. but to me it look like it affect more the out of focus area then the subject in focus.
one more thing work with camera progressive.



Which video cameras do you tend to use when putting a net behind the lens?

Thanks.
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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 07:01 AM

Which video cameras do you tend to use when putting a net behind the lens?

Preferably one where the lens comes off. ;)
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#9 Walter Graff

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 07:52 AM

Before you go nuts adding stuff to blur the picture, try finding a nice in-camera setting that gives you a great film look with the JVC. Tim Dashwood has a lot of great settings to try:


http://dvinfo.net/co...mp;d=1178154950
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 02:41 PM

Walter brings up a good point. Many cameras can be adjusted to give a picture more like what film would in a situation. For somewhere to start, you will generally be adjusting the knee settings as far round as possible. The sharpening and detail coring will be going down, as will the chroma most likely. I know that's vague but it's only a place to start your tests.
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#11 tony powell

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 05:49 PM

Many thanks guys for all your help and useful comments to my original question. You've certainly given me food for thought...
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