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Speaking of Eyemos.....


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#1 Matt Butler

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 11:23 PM

Not sure if this belongs here but after all it is about a 35mm camera.

I have a couple of these Eyemo warhorses with contemporary optics and motors.
The resulting images after a Spirit telecine transfer to HD are superb (2048 x 1556).

I have been messing around with digital stills cameras as well but have found the time involved in digitising, rendering and re-migrating large motion files to be significant.

Ironically a lot of the material I shoot is time-lapse so spending additional time in post is time I can't afford. ( in more ways than one)

I'm currently biased towards film, especially after watching Smoke operators retouch dead pixels and the like from digital accquisation technologies.

Time for some comments?
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#2 John Butler

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:33 PM

Care to post a few 2048X1556 stills?
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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 09:30 PM

Not sure if this belongs here but after all it is about a 35mm camera.

I have a couple of these Eyemo warhorses with contemporary optics and motors.
The resulting images after a Spirit telecine transfer to HD are superb (2048 x 1556).



What motor is that? I have a NCS Intervalometer motor for mine do you have it running in timelapse there or a variable speed motor for 6-48fps? I need to get my variable speed motor working and I think it's 24V...

I broke a little panny hvx the other day when I went to shoot some eyemo hand cranked and all I could think of the plastic camera was you little wimp... eyemo's a secret weapon and the pictures and size soo sweet...


Rob
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#4 Matt Butler

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 02:41 AM

I purchased that particular Eyemo from a local special fx company.

It had no accompanying documentation but it appears that it had been adapted for single frame use with a high torque 12v motor and internal micro swiches for shutter open, mid-position, and shutter closed positioning.

The motor has a unique "dumb-default" mode of running continually at 1fps if the timing electronics in the intervalometer controller fails, as I found out unexpectedly on a shoot.

It is one of my favourite cameras to always have loaded and on standby in the boot/trunk of the car to capture that unusual time lapse shot that otherwise you'd kick yourself for because you didn't have a camera with you at the time.

Edited by Matt Butler, 02 June 2008 - 02:45 AM.

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#5 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:24 PM

It is one of my favourite cameras to always have loaded and on standby in the boot/trunk of the car to capture that unusual time lapse shot that otherwise you'd kick yourself for because you didn't have a camera with you at the time.



I hear that! with newer glass the thing is just great perfect to get those shots, as you said, and indestructible to boot... Check out NCS Intervalometers at www.intervalometers.com I have been shooting all kinds of undercrank with mine since I got it a year or so ago, including many celestial events with long duration shutter settings.

-Rob-

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#6 Matt Butler

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 02:19 AM

Hi Rob,
I've been using Eyemo's filming a short project about the Sydney Harbour Bridge for my university post-graduate course. (Try lugging a Mitchell GC and accessories up to to the top of the main arch - my AC did once and it almost wiped him out - never again!)

It is somewhat ironic that a 60 year old WW2 camera operated by a cameraperson of a certain age is photographing a 75 year old bridge mainly in time lapse.

Has anyone ever modified an Eyemo to run in reverse?

There is just something about Eyemo's.

I have attached a link to a short clip from an offline edit of the project for your interest.


View on Vimeo
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#7 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 03:24 AM

Really cool looking, great montage of the bridge. I love the dark sky stuff too, don't get that here in the northeast US, the two star timelapse shots I posted were in Princeton, NJ lots of NYC light pollution, not like the Au night sky saw similar in Africa when younger all those stars! who would have thought....

cheers.....

-Rob-
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#8 Nate Downes

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 06:28 AM

Has anyone ever modified an Eyemo to run in reverse?

No, but I do have a DeVry that does.
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#9 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:04 AM

Hi Rob,
I've been using Eyemo's filming a short project about the Sydney Harbour Bridge for my university post-graduate course.



Oh just wondering, are you using Sunpath or Sunpredictor and a compass/clinometer to frame up things like the solar transition with bridge in foreground or are you just lucky/seeing where the sun is at...?

I just got a Suunto tandem and plan to add Sunpath to my kit, in addition to the SolII app for the Palm that I have been using.


-Rob-
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#10 Matt Butler

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 02:20 AM

[quote name='Robert Houllahan' date='Jun 6 2008, 02:04 AM' post='235194']
Oh just wondering, are you using Sunpath or Sunpredictor and a compass/clinometer to frame up things like the solar transition with bridge in foreground or are you just lucky/seeing where the sun is at...?


I use astronomy software called VOYAGER to plot Sun/Moon rises and sets.
It enables me to plan in degrees, seconds and even arc seconds where the Sun will appear and the time it will take to move from point A to point B through frame as required.

I usually print out a zoomed in Google satellite photo of the location area. With a good protractor and ruler I can overlay a sight line placing the Sun near, behind or where-ever it needs to be in frame and trace back along the line of azimuth to determine a good shooting position.
Using the combination of degrees and seconds of azimuth (horizontal co-ordinates eg. 90 degrees is due East) and of declination (co-ordinates of an object in the sky eg. +90 degrees, the Sun is theorectically directly overhead) helps me block the shot.

NEVER look at the Sun - especially through a reflex viewfinder with your eyes as it will cause long term eye damage. I use a large Solar Filter ( it is visually opaque except for viewing the dim circle of the Sun's disc - available from reputable astronomy suppliers) which I use to set the beginning of the Sun in shot and then quickly remove it once the camera is running and my eye is away from the finder - if the camera has one of course.

For traditional film capture using a regular reflex camera, a capping shutter is advised for long intervals between exposures to prevent light leaks through the internal shutter.

A question to the digital brotherhood .... what happens to your camera sensor when you shoot frequent extended time lapse Sun sequences ... any long term damage ?
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