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All day sun set


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#1 Chris Stones

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 07:32 AM

I'm shooting a civil war film in Savannah at the end of June and the script calls for a lot of sun set scenes. I've been told we will not be able to shoot all of this at the correct time and on days where we have more extras and time is of the essence we will have to shoot all day and make it look like sun set. How can I do this?

Some of these scenes are in a clearing but some are in quite a dense forest.

I had thought about shooting the wides at the correct time of day and then cheating on the close ups by not showing the sky and then using large silks to cut the over head hard sun light and use HMIs through a frame to fire in the softer lower angled light, but I've been informed this is too expensive. Out of interest if we did have the budget would this have been the right approach? Obviously the backgrounds in these shots would have had the "wrong" light and would probably have been a bit brighter too but would this have mattered? Would the audience have noticed?

So I need a cheaper alternative to the problem. Would gelled tungstens work OK? Or would they end up having to be so big to compensate for their natural inneficiency compard to HMIs and then the gel on top that they would be expensive anyway and need huge amounts of power? Can I rely on mirrors and shiney boards to give me my cross light key? Do I need to approach the scenes in the clearing differently to the scenes in the forest? Obviously putting up silks in the forest and finding areas of sun light to reflect in the correct direction may be harder as so much is shaded.

Any thoughts on filters I can use to enhance the look?

This is a big project for me (my grad film for the London Film School) so it means a lot to me to get it right, so any advice would be really appreciated.

Thanks in advance
Chris
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 May 2008 - 01:07 AM

I had thought about shooting the wides at the correct time of day and then cheating on the close ups by not showing the sky and then using large silks to cut the over head hard sun light and use HMIs through a frame to fire in the softer lower angled light, but I've been informed this is too expensive. Out of interest if we did have the budget would this have been the right approach? Obviously the backgrounds in these shots would have had the "wrong" light and would probably have been a bit brighter too but would this have mattered? Would the audience have noticed?


As far as I know, this is exactly the approach to take. The backgrounds of those closeups will look more or less right as long as you add enough light to be able to darken the bg some, just so it doesn't look like bright noon or afternoon.

An alternate and cheaper approach is to use the same silks over talent but then use shinyboards rather than the large HMIs. The sunset color will come from overall filtration on the lens.
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