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#1 Ronald Gaspard

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 10:36 PM

I know this is a stupid question, but if someone gave you a dvtape, with no other information available from the person who shot the video. How can you tell what settings it was shot with, such as 30fps, 24p, audio settings etc.... Because you need those settings to use in FCP to capture.
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#2 David Auner aac

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 01:04 AM

You put the information on the cover and the sticker of the tape. If that's not enough room for you give them a folded sheet with all the info on it.

Cheers, Dave
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#3 Josh Bass

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 02:11 AM

I can think of a really weird, roundabout way to do it. . .


If you have access to Windows (and I'm not even sure this would work, truthfully), you could try downloading the Vegas 8 demo, and capturing a small sample of the footage (or are there different framerates, etc. on the same tape?) it with that. Vegas doesn't make you specify capture settings, it just takes stuff in. Once its in, you can find the clip's properties, including framerate, and a few other things. This is, again, assuming that everything on the tape has the same settings. Audio's anyone's guess.
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#4 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 02:29 AM

I know this is a stupid question, but if someone gave you a dvtape, with no other information available from the person who shot the video. How can you tell what settings it was shot with, such as 30fps, 24p, audio settings etc.... Because you need those settings to use in FCP to capture.


The honest answer is you dont know if it wasnt told to you or written anywhere. Perhaps by trial and error you can find out by which frame rate looks natural. The reason you can't know without trying is because all DV tapes in the NTSC standard are 60 interlaced frames/sec. The actual NTSC standard is 59.94i but 60i is a close approximation. If 24p footage was shot, it will either be a 2:3 method or a 2:3:3:2 pulldown method. The 2:3 method is for use with getting a "film feel" but the 2:3:3:2 is used for filmouts so no frame data is destroyed. 30p footage of course has an even 2:1 ratio...each progressive frame is 2 interlaced frames. I would think that by previewing the footage on your camcorder that you should have an idea of if it's 24p vs. 30p or 60i. 24p is very obviously different than 60i in feel and flow. 30p vs 60i might be harder to tell unless you're savvy.
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#5 David Auner aac

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 02:52 AM

Ok, seems I misread what you were asking. You already have an unknown tape. Sorry...

Cheers, Dave
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#6 Dave Green

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 03:50 AM

Audio's anyone's guess.


If the audio's from the DV tape then your Vegas solution will work perfectly for the audio properties, too.
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