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HVX200 with pro35mm VS Sony F900


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#1 Marie Davignon

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 12:00 AM

Hi!

First of all sorry if my english is not perfect, it isn't my first language... I am a young DP, just starting my carreer, and I would need some advice.

I am shooting a short soon in HD and we hope to tranfert it in 35mm. I have been offered a great deal for the Sony F900, but I was wondering if I was better to go with my first idea, wich was to use the panasonic HVX200 (720p 24pN) with a pro35, to get less depth of field and to have an image closer to a film look?

thanks a lot,

marie
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#2 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 12:57 AM

Tough one. On the editing level the DVCPRO HD material is going to be a lot easier to deal with than the HDCAM footage.

Picture wise, I would ask for a chance to do a test on both camera configurations and judge yourself based on that. I like both formats for different reasons.

Ultimately it is you who will have to live with the footage so no amount of information you could get from our peers is going to make any choice better if you are not one hundred percent happy with the footage you are generating.

Just my personal opinion, though.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 04 June 2008 - 12:57 AM.

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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 05:44 AM

I'd go with F900, many feature films for theatrical release have been shot with the camera. The HVX 200 is basically a prosumer camera, which has less resolution and that won't be helped by using a Pro 35. This set up is fine for TV, but on the large screen it will suffer, especially your wide shots.

However, you should sort out your post workflow in advance and a set up for the F900 that best suits your transfer to 35mm.
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#4 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:29 AM

I'd go with F900, many feature films for theatrical release have been shot with the camera. The HVX 200 is basically a prosumer camera, which has less resolution and that won't be helped by using a Pro 35. This set up is fine for TV, but on the large screen it will suffer, especially your wide shots.


I've worked on and have viewed four theatrical screenings on full-size screens from projects shot on the HVX with mini35 adapters, then transferred to 35mm and they looked pretty impressive for "what they are", much better than I expected but all the other elements of the production where of high quality to start with. The same with F900 shot projects. However, it does not sound like she is headed toward a "theatrical release" quite yet?

Marie, either a mini35 or Pro35 adapter will give you the depth of field look you want on those cameras. If this is one of your first few shorts and the first time working in HD w/35mm adapters don't get bogged down too much by exotic or complex equipment choices. It sounds like you might be editing on FCP and if that is the case your editor, workflow and budget may point you to the HVX. On the other hand, if using the F900 allows you to save a few thousand dollars or more that can be invested in a higher production value of the film and not bite you in the budget on the post side then there is your answer.

Have fun!

Robert Starling, SOC
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:40 AM

The HVX is soft and noisy, and the Pro35 will make it softer and noisier. I can't imagine a less appropriate combination.

P
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 01:10 PM

The choice is obvious, the F-900. It's a 2/3" camera with full 1920 x 1080 chips. The other is 1/3" with 960 x 540 chips. For resolution and depth of field, it doesn't have a chance against the F-900. It's like comparing a car with a motor scooter. Also consider the ergonomics of working with an operator and focus puller. The pro camera is set up for that, the consumer camera is intended for one person shooting hand held.



-- J.S.
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#7 Serge Teulon

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 01:29 PM

For the obvious reasons that John has stated I think the F900...but I have seen some really nice stuff shot on the HVX with the P35. I think it is by far the best prosumer cam out there at the mo.
If you can get both cams in for a test and judge which one fits your needs.

Edited by Serge Teulon, 04 June 2008 - 01:30 PM.

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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 01:41 PM

I too would suggest the 900, as you can control DoF due to it's larger chips and screw the mini-35. It won't be 35mm DoF, of course, but will be around S16mm. The stuff I've seen from the 900 is pretty impressive, though the issue of post workflow is something to consider; don't forget you're shooting for post in a lot of ways!

Best of luck!
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#9 Marie Davignon

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 11:28 PM

Thanks for all your advice, they were very helpfull!
I finally chose the F900 and I found a really good deal for post after all.
As it is, in fact, for theatrical purpose, I guess it is the best choice for the project.

marie
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