Jump to content


Photo

Newbie question


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1570 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 04 June 2008 - 01:57 AM

Can one of you experts give me a small list of films that were shot with a RED?

How does the RED compare with the D20 or Genesis?
  • 0

#2 Michel Hafner

Michel Hafner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 300 posts
  • Other

Posted 04 June 2008 - 04:34 AM

http://us.imdb.com/S...d...o.y=8&Go=Go
(ignore the obvious errors, looks like a bug)

Edited by Michel Hafner, 04 June 2008 - 04:38 AM.

  • 0

#3 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:26 AM

Can one of you experts give me a small list of films that were shot with a RED?

Define "Film".
If you mean "Films you have more than a vague chance of seeing in your local cinema or video store", at present there really are none.

As far as I am aware Soderbergh's "Che" has no mainstream distribution secured. Since the film is about four hours long, in Spanish with subtitles, has not received much positive critical response, and has been criticised for its lack of factual accuracy, it quite likely never will.

There are all sorts of low budget RED projects in the works, which would otherwise would probably have been shot on HD videotape. I would be very interested to see some of them just to see how the RED performs in real-world situations, (particularly operated by sort of people who frequent certain frums:-) but I seriously doubt many of them will ever see the light of day anywhere near me.

A while back I asked here if anybody could give me examples of RED-originated footage (ads, docos, anything really) currently being shown on Australian TV. Apart from some horribly degraded and very transient RED footage used in the local Seven Network's Beijing Olympics promos, I have yet to see a single frame of real-world RED footage. At least, that I know about. (Note: Downloads are NOT real-world footage.)

So far there has been sizzle overkill and very little steak.

"How does the RED compare with the D20 or Genesis?"
Good question. It probably gives a sharper picture, but for all practical purposes it will probably look very similar, since there is currently little call for >2K resolution. It is a much cheaper camera to buy, but it doesn't fit into existing tape-based workflows, which is a lot more of a hurdle than many people realize.

Eventually all this will become clearer.
  • 0

#4 Matthew Rogers

Matthew Rogers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 175 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Knoxville, TN

Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:39 AM

A while back I asked here if anybody could give me examples of RED-originated footage (ads, docos, anything really) currently being shown on Australian TV. Apart from some horribly degraded and very transient RED footage used in the local Seven Network's Beijing Olympics promos, I have yet to see a single frame of real-world RED footage. At least, that I know about. (Note: Downloads are NOT real-world footage.)


Did you not see the RED music video that aired during the Super Bowl? It looked pretty freakin good when compared to the other spots running in 720P. I was also watching ABC one night and saw the Old Navy spots that were shot on RED. It looked much better then other spots because it was so grain free. That said, I can often tell when there is CGI involved in spots because they don't seem to try matching the grain of film in the CGI stuff. Of course, it could also make a difference of what the footage was telecined on.

BTW, why don't you take some of the 1080p spots that are on RedUser and play them out on a TV? If a broadcaster is going to degrade the image, it's gonna happen just as much to a 35mm source as a RED source.

Matthew
  • 0

#5 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 04 June 2008 - 04:52 PM

There are quite a few in production, post production, and pre-production that will get theatrical distribution. The question is how wide? I'm sure a couple will show on quite a few screens but most will probably get the NY, LA, Miami, Chicago type of release.
Just as an example: David Mullen is currently shooting a movie on the Red, I'm about to start one, and a friend of mine just finished one. And all of these will have some kind of theatrical I'm sure.
So there are some on the way, but very few, if any, that have already been released.
  • 0

#6 Jim Jannard

Jim Jannard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 361 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 June 2008 - 10:33 PM

There are many in production (remember we just started shipping 8 months ago).

"Guerrilla"- Steven Soderbergh starring Benecio del Toro- completed
"The Argentine"- Steven Soderbergh starring Benecio del Toro- completed
"The Informant"- Steven Soderbergh starring Matt Damon- in production
"Beyond a Reasonable Doubt"- Peter Hyams starring Michael Douglas- in production
"The Game"- Neveldine and Taylor starring Gerard Butler- in post production
"Crank 2" Neveldine and Taylor starring Jason Stratham- filming
"Knowing"- Alex Proyas starring Nicholas Cage- post production
"District 9"- Neill Blomkamp- in production

parts of :

"Jumper"- Doug Liman starring Hayden Christensen- released
For those that discount this one, please watch Doug Liman's interview on red.com

many more that are prepping and several I'm forgetting.

Jim
  • 0

#7 Jim Jannard

Jim Jannard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 361 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 June 2008 - 01:14 AM

On the commercial side, the following are now being shot on RED.

Jaguar
Toyota
Mazda
Nissan
Gatorade
Target
7-11
Subway
Allstate

Also...

"Manure"- David Mullen starring Billy Bob Thornton

plus several more that we have been told we cannot mention yet.

Jim
  • 0

#8 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1570 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 05 June 2008 - 02:30 AM

Thanks all. I was reading about the kind of resolution the RED is supposed to be able to capture and reproduce. I was wondering what had been shot with it, and wanted to have a gander.

Thanks for the feedback.
  • 0

#9 Glen Alexander

Glen Alexander
  • Guests

Posted 05 June 2008 - 05:04 AM

Did you not see the RED music video that aired during the Super Bowl?


In Australia, US "football" does not rank that highly as something to be watched to be honest. Especially when it comes on at weird hours in the morning or middle of afternoon.

When you have real contact sports without all of that padding, the NFL is tame.

Have a look at "footy", Aussie rules, Adelaide Crows, etc
or rugby, my fav team, the New Zealand All Blacks

Jonah Lomu in his prime, could thrash any NFL running back.

Edited by Glen Alexander, 05 June 2008 - 05:06 AM.

  • 0

#10 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 05 June 2008 - 05:52 AM

In Australia, US "football" does not rank that highly as something to be watched to be honest. Especially when it comes on at weird hours in the morning or middle of afternoon.

I think you can only see it live on "50 channels and there's nothin' on" cable over here.

The sight of those lads in their crash helmets and Buzz Lightyear getups tends to provoke more amusement here than excitement. Besides, exactly WHO do you expect us to cheer for?

American Football has quite a lot on common with European Football, in regard to the number of fatal injuries sustained, the main difference is that in Europe it tends to be the spectators rather than the players. Here, fatalities or even serious injuries are extremely rare, on both sides of the fence.

I've heard that watching Australian Football in the wee hours is surprisingly popular with sleepless American women. I suppose it's all the tight shorts, hairy legs and lack of blood and fatalities :lol:
  • 0

#11 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 05 June 2008 - 06:10 AM

Thanks all. I was reading about the kind of resolution the RED is supposed to be able to capture and reproduce. I was wondering what had been shot with it, and wanted to have a gander.

So do I, and so do quite a lot of industry people I know who remain as baffled as I am.

As far as resolution goes, very few people will have access to 4K display devices of any sort, and 4K DI is still so expensive that even big budget films like Indy 4 and Iron Man only used 2K. In theory 4K downconverted to 2K still should look better than native 2K, but you still need top dollar Post people to get the benefit to come out the other end.

None of the responses here or earlier have been of any real help. I'd like to be able to say: "Well, this Ad or that show was shot with a RED camera," so telling me about American commercials or footage that has been and gone is not a lot of help.

Are the US ads mentioned shown in Australia?

That IMDB list is a bit of a worry; have you had a close look at the details of some of those productions?

What is likely to happen is that the phrase "Shot on RED" is soon going to be as meaningless as "Composed an a PC" (or Mac). Exactly the same camera will be used for seven figure productions and seven dollar productions.

So will this result in a paradigm shift, or a trainwreck? Who knows. Certainly not the RED fanboys.

Either way, established players in the industry would like at least a shot at predicting which way the wind will blow.
  • 0

#12 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 05 June 2008 - 06:17 AM

Also...

"Manure"- David Mullen starring Billy Bob Thornton


Jim

Plus the Australian made feature "The Nothing Men" (as featured on the RED.com website!) and which may yet be the first all-RED feature to get a distribution deal.
  • 0

#13 Glen Alexander

Glen Alexander
  • Guests

Posted 05 June 2008 - 08:27 AM

I've heard that watching Australian Football in the wee hours is surprisingly popular with sleepless American women. I suppose it's all the tight shorts, hairy legs and lack of blood and fatalities :lol:


Oh, yeah like that player from St. Kilda, the commentators call him "the G train", others call him "the G string" ha ha ha
  • 0

#14 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1570 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 05 June 2008 - 04:15 PM

So do I, and so do quite a lot of industry people I know who remain as baffled as I am.

As far as resolution goes, very few people will have access to 4K display devices of any sort, and 4K DI is still so expensive that even big budget films like Indy 4 and Iron Man only used 2K. In theory 4K downconverted to 2K still should look better than native 2K, but you still need top dollar Post people to get the benefit to come out the other end.

None of the responses here or earlier have been of any real help. I'd like to be able to say: "Well, this Ad or that show was shot with a RED camera," so telling me about American commercials or footage that has been and gone is not a lot of help.

Are the US ads mentioned shown in Australia?

That IMDB list is a bit of a worry; have you had a close look at the details of some of those productions?

What is likely to happen is that the phrase "Shot on RED" is soon going to be as meaningless as "Composed an a PC" (or Mac). Exactly the same camera will be used for seven figure productions and seven dollar productions.

So will this result in a paradigm shift, or a trainwreck? Who knows. Certainly not the RED fanboys.

Either way, established players in the industry would like at least a shot at predicting which way the wind will blow.

Keith; I was curious about Indy 4. I saw it the other night at a local theatre, and it looked like it was shot digitally. But, to my eyes, the resolution compared to a good high grade 35mm stock just wasn't there. But that's just my opinion, and I'm basing that off of the original Raiders of the Lost Ark film.

I watched "Two Mules for Sister Sara" and "Braveheart" last week, and compared their footage with some digitally shot films. It seems like raw footage from the camera or from a hard disk looks really crisp, but when its transferred to film for distribution in the theatres, to me at least, it looks like it loses quite a bit of resolution.

All the data on the RED says that this shouldn't be an issue, and, again based on the kind of resolution it's supposed to give, I'm wondering why people don't drop the Alta Vista, D20 and the rest to shoot on a RED. Is the camera that new?

But, like I've announced on other threads, I've been out of film and video for ten years, and am trying to get back in, so I'm pretty wet behind the ears. Still, I want to get as much info here and elsewhere as I can so I don't look like a complete dumb-&*$% when I walk back onto a set.

p.s. I've seen Australian Rules football, and that is not a sport for the feint of heart.

Edited by George Ebersole, 05 June 2008 - 04:16 PM.

  • 0

#15 Scott Fritzshall

Scott Fritzshall
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 05 June 2008 - 04:48 PM

Keith; I was curious about Indy 4. I saw it the other night at a local theatre, and it looked like it was shot digitally. But, to my eyes, the resolution compared to a good high grade 35mm stock just wasn't there. But that's just my opinion, and I'm basing that off of the original Raiders of the Lost Ark film.

Indy 4 was shot on 35mm Anamorphic.

All the data on the RED says that this shouldn't be an issue, and, again based on the kind of resolution it's supposed to give, I'm wondering why people don't drop the Alta Vista, D20 and the rest to shoot on a RED. Is the camera that new?

There's quite a bit more to cameras than just resolution.
  • 0

#16 Thomas James

Thomas James
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 844 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 05 June 2008 - 05:26 PM

As far as high resolution displays Costco Wholesale is selling 24 inch computer monitors with 2560 x 1600 resolution which is 4 times the resolution of 720p and double the resolution of 1080p for $1000. This will be perfect for Scarlet who only need to see their footage in 3K. Toshiba is introducing a 84 inch 4k television but these are handbuilt so they cost $50,000. Once mass production kicks in the costs will fall and these televisios will cost 4 times the cost of a 1080p television or $4000 or a 42 inch 4k television for $2000. Next year Red will be introducing their 4K player for a thousand dollars. Slowly but surely there will be 4K content available. As the prices of HD televisions fall manufacturers will be lookong for the next generation 4k displays in order to upsell the consumer.
  • 0

#17 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1570 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 05 June 2008 - 08:36 PM

Indy 4 was shot on 35mm Anamorphic.

There's quite a bit more to cameras than just resolution.

Really? I guess the theatre I went to had a bad print or something, because it didn't look all that sharp... maybe the projector was out of focus.
  • 0

#18 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 06 June 2008 - 07:41 AM

Keith; I was curious about Indy 4. I saw it the other night at a local theatre, and it looked like it was shot digitally. But, to my eyes, the resolution compared to a good high grade 35mm stock just wasn't there. But that's just my opinion, and I'm basing that off of the original Raiders of the Lost Ark film.


You can read my comments on it here.

I saw a very high quality digital projection and apart from a few dynamic range niggles I thought the quality was extremely good. However there is digital projection and there is digital projection. This was in a brand new installation with a new projector lamp, and a projectionist who used binoculars to focus!

Most film releases are going to be at minimum a fourth generation copy of the original negative, whereas with DI to (good!) digital projection, you are more or less effectively projecting the original negative. I've said it before and I'll say it again, film projection will disappear long before film origination!


All the data on the RED says that this shouldn't be an issue, and, again based on the kind of resolution it's supposed to give, I'm wondering why people don't drop the Alta Vista, D20 and the rest to shoot on a RED. Is the camera that new?


Alta Vista? You mean CineAlta?
OK, first off, the CineAlta is a TV camera, despite what George Lucas and a few other chuckleheads tried to tell us. Star Wars II was captured on 1440 x 800 pixel videotape. Better than film? Super-8 maybe.
The CineAlta/F900/F950 etc are excellent for making TV programs, mainly because they were designed from the ground up to fit the workflow of TV studios. Movie cameras they are not.

Despite the hype, the D-20 and Genesis are still fairly minor players in the scheme of things, and the Genesis is really just a single-chip version of the F950, primarily a TV camera, albeit one that can take 35mm cinematography lenses.

The RED has only been shipping for about 9 months, the first 100 made were recalled, and shiping seems stalled around the 1700 mark. Still a lot of cameras, but how many will ever get to do anything worthwhile is anybody's guess. Their biggest problem is that they've tried to make something that gives the quality of 35mm film origination, but with the convenience of a video camera. They haven't really produced either.

And then there are the endless software upgrades, currently "build 16". Apparently for the first time, operators will now be able to accurately monitor what the CMOS chip is doing exposure-wise, you know, like you have been able to do with Betacam etc for 25 years or so:-)

The RED does not easily fit into existing Post Production workflows, but as soon as anybody brings that up on any of these forums, they get hammered by the fanboys desperate to "explain" the sequence of workarounds. Which eventually starts to add up to: "Oh that's right, that's why we use film!" (or HDCAM etc).

Yes, there are plenty of bright-eyed broom closet Post startups ready willing and able to handle .R3D files, but the thing is, can they EDIT?! You know, like that famous photo: "Microsoft 1978 - would YOU have invested?"

All of these issues can be dealt with of course, but they do have a way of mounting up.

It's beginning to sound to me (and quite a few of my colleagues) that the Epic is really the camera the RED should have been. (And Jannard & Co are dreaming if they think nobody else can build a camera like that). RED have built the IBM PCXT of video cameras, Epic will be the '386 but somebody else will probably build the Macintosh:-).

But, like I've announced on other threads, I've been out of film and video for ten years, and am

trying to get back in, so I'm pretty wet behind the ears. Still, I want to get as much info here and elsewhere as I can so I don't look like a complete dumb-&*$% when I walk back onto a set.

Well same here, more or less. (Don't worry, most productions currently DON'T use REDs). Naturally it's good to know something about the beasts but as you'll discover, hard and useful information can be really difficult to hold of. (For a start, why not download the users manual from www.red.com)

Video downloads are generally a waste of time; all people want is everyday accessible examples, like a list of TV commericals that were shot on RED. But whenever I have asked straight out for examples all I have gotten is bizarre responses to the effect that "The important thing is that you are seeing RED ads and not even noticing." What does that mean? There are ads with superb image quality (obviously shot on 35mm film) and others that look they were shot on a Handycam!
It begins to resemble the old adage: "To lose one husband is a tragedy, losing two begins to sound like carelessness!"
  • 0

#19 Glen Alexander

Glen Alexander
  • Guests

Posted 06 June 2008 - 08:31 AM

Alta Vista? You mean CineAlta?


ha ha alta vista... the search engine without all of the google cookies or javascript urchins tracking your every click. they have a great ftp search engine

Yes, there are plenty of bright-eyed broom closet Post startups ready willing and able to handle .R3D files, but the thing is, can they EDIT?! You know, like that famous photo: "Microsoft 1978 - would YOU have invested?"


what are you on about? all of the digital work flows i've read about dump massive amount of sequential image files, they don't write to a standard "movie container". i can pull-in any bit-dept dpx or any other image format file with matlab and manipulate the images any way i want. matlab has brilliant tools for editing any kinds of images period. the user interface is geared more towards scientific/engineering types rather than typical adobe users.

if you want to multiplex 24bit/192khz/7.1 DTS with 14-bit dpx into a full high-res "movie container", now that's a tougher problem even with time codes.

for a simplier solution, if you have the money, buy a couple national instrument software packages NI Vision.

here's part of the matlab code to pull in any dpx file...

% DPX image file reader (SMPTE 268M-2003 Reference)
%
% Originaly from:
% © 2006 Jeff Mather, Mathworks
% Extended by:
% © 2007 Amilcar Lucas, IDA TU-Braunschweig
% Chopped and hacked by:
% © 2008 Glen Alexander, Gestalt Prod
%
% Convert the buffer to an array of output pixels.
%
% DPX files can also contain bit-depths that cause pixel samples not to end
% on byte boundaries (e.g., 10-bit and 12-bit images) plus 14bit either LI or BI
switch bitDepth
case 8
pixels = buffer((startOfPixels + 1):endOfPixels);
case 10
% SMPTE 268M-2003 Reference
% Fig. C.3 10-bit components filled to 32-bit boundary
pixels = typecast(buffer((startOfPixels + 1):endOfPixels), 'uint32');
pixels = swapFcn(pixels);
if (numChannels == 1) % grayscale
% do some bit splicing to extract the gray information
pixel0 = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -02, 10));
pixel1 = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -12, 10));
pixel2 = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -22, 10));
% Rearrange the data to follow MATLAB's conventions.
pixels = [pixel0 pixel1 pixel2];
pixels = reshape(pixels', [columns, rows])';
else % RGB
% Rearrange the data to follow MATLAB's conventions.
pixels = reshape(pixels, [columns, rows])';
% do some bit splicing to extract the color information
pixelsb = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -02, 10));
pixelsg = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -12, 10));
pixelsr = uint16(bitshift(pixels, -22, 10));
% pack it back to a matlab friendly array
clear pixels;
pixels(:,:,3) = pixelsb;
pixels(:,:,2) = pixelsg;
pixels(:,:,1) = pixelsr;
end
% return because we do not need the normal function flow in this case
return
case {12, 14}
% SMPTE 268M-2003 Reference
% Fig. C.5 12-bit components filled to 16-bit boundary
% 14-bit components filled to 16-bit boundary
pixels = typecast(buffer((startOfPixels + 1):endOfPixels), 'uint16');
pixels = swapFcn(pixels);
% do some bit splicing to extract the information
pixels = uint16(bitshift(pixels, int8(bitDepth)-16, bitDepth));
if (numChannels == 1) % grayscale
% Rearrange the data to follow MATLAB's conventions.
pixels=reshape(pixels, [columns, rows]);
else % RGB
% Rearrange the data to follow MATLAB's conventions.
pixels=reshape(pixels', [3, columns, rows]);
pixels=permute(pixels,[3,2,1]);
end
% return because we do not need the normal function flow in this case
return
case 16
pixels = typecast(buffer((startOfPixels + 1):endOfPixels), 'uint16');
pixels = swapFcn(pixels);
otherwise
error(['Unsupported bit-depth: ' num2str(bitDepth) '-bits per component']);
end
% Rearrange the data to follow MATLAB's conventions.
pixels = reshape(pixels, [numChannels, columns, rows]);
pixels = permute(pixels, [3 2 1]);
  • 0

#20 Michael Lehnert

Michael Lehnert
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1086 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK / Basel, CH

Posted 06 June 2008 - 11:10 AM

Alta Vista? You mean CineAlta?
OK, first off, the CineAlta is a TV camera, despite what George Lucas and a few other chuckleheads tried to tell us. Star Wars II was captured on 1440 x 800 pixel videotape. Better than film? Super-8 maybe.


Only occassionally dipping into this sub-forum (it's too often radioactively contaminated... intellectually, that is), it was quite nice to read an honest post her.

As regards Super 8:
Based on the MTF of S8's 7217 which responds with at least 100 lp/mm at 20% in the green layer, one could ideally expect a minimum resolution of 1072x802 pixel with a projection frame of 4.01 by 5.36mm, and 1130x844 pixel with a camera frame of 4.22 by 5.65mm. The new 7265 is not far behind on that. Even the old K-40 stated a resolving power of 70 lp/mm at 20% (i.e. 750x561 to 791x591 pixel), beating DigiBeta easily...

But trust me, no videographer wants to read or hear that Super 8 has a higher resolving power and greater colour depth than video gear 500times more expensive. All they see in their mind to is crappy home movies. If they oogle when seeing RED footage, their heads might explode seeing S8 footage adequately scanned at HD or 2K on a Rank and projected in a serious screening room (and those get increasingly rare, too).


It begins to resemble the old adage: "To lose one husband is a tragedy, losing two begins to sound like carelessness!"



To provide you with Oscar Wilde's original:
"To loose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to loose both looks like carelessness."

And while we are at the importance of being earnest on matters discussing digital video, the quest for actual footage, and the resulting opinions and posts formed and expressed nowadays thanks to marketing efforts that unsubstantiately inflate those cam's contribution to cinema and innovation for cinematography rather than practical experience on set or location, reminds me of another Wilde:

"Ignorance is a delicate exotic fruit; touch it and the bloom is gone."

And so we will think of current video gear in 5 years time, as we now ridicule U-matic ENG, which was once regarded as far superior to 16mm & 35mm VNF cine-films... oh, the blunder...
  • 0


Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Opal

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Glidecam

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets