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Woody Allen's Manhattan, Film Stock?


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#1 Tim Carroll

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 06:16 PM

Does anyone know (or know how to find out) what film stock Gordon Willis used when he was shooting Woody Allen's Manhattan?

Did he use 5231, or 5222, or did he use color stock and de-saturate (was that even done back then)?

Any and all info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
-Tim
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:00 PM

Manhattan was filmed on Kodak 5222 B & W stock.
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#3 Tim Carroll

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:07 PM

Manhattan was filmed on Kodak 5222 B & W stock.


Thank you for the reply. If I may, how do you know that it was filmed on Kodak 5222, where does one find this information?

Best,
-Tim
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 01:11 AM

Thank you for the reply. If I may, how do you know that it was filmed on Kodak 5222, where does one find this information?

Best,
-Tim


Nov. '82 issue of American Cinematographer, on the lighting of "Manhattan".
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#5 Tim Carroll

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 09:30 AM

Nov. '82 issue of American Cinematographer, on the lighting of "Manhattan".


Thank you. Is there an archive where one can go to view back issues of American Cinematographer? Is any of that available digitally online?

Best,
-Tim
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#6 Dan Goulder

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:15 AM

Thank you. Is there an archive where one can go to view back issues of American Cinematographer? Is any of that available digitally online?

Best,
-Tim

You can see what's available at theasc.com. If you're looking for a comparison between 5231 and 5222, a modern example would be the Cate Blanchette portion of "I'm Not There", which combined both stocks. I haven't yet seen the film, so I can't be more specific as to which stock was used for which scene. "Memento" shows excellent examples of what can be accomplished with well-lit Kodak 5222. (I'd be curious to know what T-stops were used for those scenes, if anyone happens to know...)
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#7 Tim Carroll

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 12:44 PM

You can see what's available at theasc.com. If you're looking for a comparison between 5231 and 5222, a modern example would be the Cate Blanchette portion of "I'm Not There", which combined both stocks. I haven't yet seen the film, so I can't be more specific as to which stock was used for which scene. "Memento" shows excellent examples of what can be accomplished with well-lit Kodak 5222. (I'd be curious to know what T-stops were used for those scenes, if anyone happens to know...)



Thanks, I have a copy of Memento that I haven't looked at in years. I'll go back and check it out.

Best,
-Tim
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Glidecam

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Ritter Battery

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Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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