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Matching Kodak B&W with Fuji F-series or Reala?


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#1 Rodrigo Silvestri

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 01:41 PM

This topic is somehow a continuation of a previous topic:
http://www.cinematog...showtopic=31486

Quickly: I am a studend and will film on Kodak 7222 or 7231 (given by school). I want to buy more film and I can buy more Kodak or buy Fuji instead.

Fuji is cheaper here, because they have a discount for students, about 1/3 of what professionals pay. But that discount is only for F-Series (F-125, F-250, F-400, F-500, F-64D, F-250D) and Reala 500D.
From Kodak I get just a 10% discount on B&W film.
Kodak doesn't sell smaller rolls here, and we'd use less than 200ft. If I buy Fuji, this is not a problem because I'm interested on using more color film later...

So, would it be possible to film with both films (not the same scenes) and match them in post? (I'm interested in doing a 1K or 2K scan, and editing in my Mac, where I have Final Cut Pro and Apple Color, so I want to know if I can make them look similar, or if it'll be a very complicated job.
I know I'd try to modify the Fuji part to make it look like the B&W film (adding grain, contrast, etc), and not the way back.

Thanks,
Rodrigo
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 01:54 PM

Yes and no. It depends on your proficiency at color correction. And, personally, I Feel that B/w has a pretty specific look which isn't really there when you pull the sat out of color. That being said, by doing a scan you have a lot of wiggle room in post.
Do you have any idea how long it will take color to render, though? It's not the fastest thing 'round! (30 min of DV footage, light corrections, all primaries, and 8 hours to render out on a G5, with 4gb ram etc). Do a test on your color correction system first of some footage so you don't wind up bitting off more than you can chew in terms of color correction.
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#3 Rodrigo Silvestri

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 02:31 PM

Yes and no. It depends on your proficiency at color correction. And, personally, I Feel that B/w has a pretty specific look which isn't really there when you pull the sat out of color. That being said, by doing a scan you have a lot of wiggle room in post.
Do you have any idea how long it will take color to render, though? It's not the fastest thing 'round! (30 min of DV footage, light corrections, all primaries, and 8 hours to render out on a G5, with 4gb ram etc). Do a test on your color correction system first of some footage so you don't wind up bitting off more than you can chew in terms of color correction.


I have color-corrected a 6-min DV short film. Don't remember exactly, but was around 30 min of rendering. I know how to use the program but don't know too much about "what" to do. Anyway, in some cases I had to color correct some things filmed with different white balances and different gain settings, and I could.
I have a Hackintosh with 4GB of RAM, a Core 2 Quad 2,4GHz processor, 2x250GB (FW and SATA2) HDs and 1x500GB (SATA2).

And the HD or 2K footage won't be over 5 min. I don't have any problem to leave my computer rendering for 48 hours, LOL.

Is there any reference that I could take to do a test? (B&W 10-bit scans?). I have some 4K DPX files (from http://www.projectred.net/), I think they might serve as the Fuji scan.

Thanks,
Rodrigo
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 11:31 PM

B&W is much cheaper already, as it is used almost exclusively by indies/amateurs/students these days.

You are not going to be able to match modern color stocks with B&W neg stocks without some serious tweaking. I'd say from what you've said of yourself here that it is beyond your abilities as a student.

IF you want more film, you're going to need to buy B&W to match the look.

I have a 400 foot can of either '31 or '22 in the fridge. Care to make me an offer?
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