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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 11:38 PM

Just watched If... on my big movie wall from a Criterion DVD. Anyone here seen it? It cut back and forth from color to the occasional B & W. According to IMDB's info, it was done on purpose. I have to say that I found the technique very effective. My sensations on it were that on the color scenes, the image came out to me. On the B & W shots, I projected back to the screen. This is similar to a trick we used in painting where reds project from out of the canvas and blues recede into the canvas. This cutting back and forth with color and B & W is a trick I'd like to steal (excuse me, appropriate).
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 04:22 AM

Apparently, reason behind the switching was they that shot B & W when they didn't have enough money left to shoot colour. This seems to be reason why there's no logic to the changes from B & W to colour in the film.

Of course, directors love recreating little myths around their films, but this seems a logical reason. Since the audiences don't know this, they only see what's presented to them on the screen and so create their own take on the visual effect.
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#3 Mitch Gross

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 10:43 PM

They pushed the story that it was for artistic reasons for a long time, but decades later the director admitted that it was because they ran out of money for the more expensive color stock. Why they didn't print everything B&W is beyond me, but I guess they could at least advertize it as a color film (well, partially).
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#4 Max Jacoby

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 02:54 AM

Tarkovsky's Stalker also switches back and forth between color and b&w for apparently the same reason.
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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 03:51 PM

This is similar to a trick we used in painting where reds project from out of the canvas and blues recede into the canvas.


this seems to be used on Conan O'Brian's opening monologues.
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#6 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 03:56 PM

Tarkovsky's Stalker also switches back and forth between color and b&w for apparently the same reason.


I suppose so, yet there seems to be a logic to it.

Inside the zone it seems to be summer, yet outside, it's winter. So the b/w eliminates any green that may be in the train yard. And anything on the outside which has been touched by the zone, the stalker's child, is color.
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#7 Max Jacoby

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 04:44 PM

To be honest I haven't analyzed Stalker for any color/b&w motivation. I recall there is one scene which starts in color (where the Stalker lays down in grass) and the next tracking shot is in b&w, ending on him again (or something along that vein).

I remember Tarkovsky in his diaries complaining about the small amount of filmstock they got.
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#8 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 03:40 PM

To be honest I haven't analyzed Stalker for any color/b&w motivation. I recall there is one scene which starts in color (where the Stalker lays down in grass) and the next tracking shot is in b&w, ending on him again (or something along that vein).

I remember Tarkovsky in his diaries complaining about the small amount of filmstock they got.


It's been quite a while since I've seen the film. There might be scenes that contradict my thesis.

i would think that he would try to put some order in the stocks he was given.

When life gives you limes, make gimlets.
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#9 Tim Partridge

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 04:07 PM

Why they didn't print everything B&W is beyond me,


I haven't seen the film in years, but wasn't the colour stuff intended to be lit and exposed rather low contrast and soft (i.e. it wouldn't hold up printed b/w)?

Always makes me laugh that Lindsey Anderson rated this in his top ten films list!
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