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China lantern


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#1 Ronney Ross

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 09:47 PM

I have been searching topics all over this site about actually wiring up a porcelain socket. If any has diagram or know of a particular web site be help me out.
Thanks

Ronney
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#2 timHealy

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 11:08 PM

Any basic electrical book will help you out.

You're creating the basic of all circuits: power source, switch, light bulb. well you don't really need to have a switch.

The Harry Box Book may have some basic film specific electrical wiring but it is not in front of me.

Best

Tim
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#3 Frank Barrera

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 12:48 AM

I have been searching topics all over this site about actually wiring up a porcelain socket. If any has diagram or know of a particular web site be help me out.
Thanks

Ronney

The reason that you will not find any diagrams about wiring on this site is because it's a potentially dangerous task and to post such a diagram would implicate the poster with any hazard that the end user might experience. That having been said you can go to a book store and look at some do-it-yourself guides on wiring simple switches and lights etc. That should satisfy your needs. But the best way is for someone with experience to show you how to do it.

Naturally one should always keep in mind that electricity can be very dangerous.
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#4 Evan Pierre

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 01:42 AM

I would suggest asking someone who knows about wiring to at least check what you have done for safety. The last thing you want is some sort of short or crossed wiring to electrocute you.

Edited by Evan Pierre, 17 June 2008 - 01:42 AM.

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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 10:48 PM

While I agree with the sentiment to make you find your own wiring diagrams, I will give one warning: If you use a switch, wire the switch to work on the hot line, not the neutral. The switch will turn off the light either way but if the neutral is cut (switched off) and the hot is left open, the fixture is quite dangerous to touch because there is still a power supply and you will be the ground.
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#6 Walter Graff

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 11:18 PM

I have been searching topics all over this site about actually wiring up a porcelain socket. If any has diagram or know of a particular web site be help me out.
Thanks

Ronney


Plenty on the web

http://www.rd.com/fa.../content/39996/

Simply put one wire to one side of socket, and other wire to other terminal. It's AC so matters not which one you connect to. If you wnat to add a switch, put it on the wire that goes to the small (narrow) prong of the plug.
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#7 Ronney Ross

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 12:41 AM

Thanks for all the advice, I am not used to dealing with electricity so I wanted to know exactly what needed to be in order to safely do it, all of the advice was needed.

Thanks,
Ronney
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Wooden Camera

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Ritter Battery

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