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Ektachrome 125T (7240) info needed?


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#1 Paco Sweetman

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 09:58 AM

Hi all. I've just bought my first 16mm camera, an ARRI ST. I am planning on shooting the first section of my feature on it.

I've been given an unopened 400ft roll of Ektachrome 7240 single perf by a friend, who bought it around 2004, as a present to shoot the film on. I'd like to use the reversal stock for something as he admits that he probably will never.

I have found a lab that another friend has mentioned called Andec Filmtechnik, in Germany to process it, then I was going to get a best light transfer in London to Digibeta.

My only worries are:

a) I don't have a 400ft mag at the moment, so I'm worried about destroying the film. Is it possible to get a lab to cut it down and put it onto 100ft daylight loading spools?

B) what happens if the film is f*cked? Can I get it clip tested? It hasn't been opened at all, but it also hasn't been kept in a fridge.

Thanks so much for any help you can advise on. I'm going to shoot my feature on film and HDV. So many people have told me that I'm an idiot to buy a film camera and shoot celluloid...
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#2 John Holland

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 11:07 AM

Sorry to be negative but i wouldnt waste any money whats so ever on that roll of 7240 not kept in fridge !! and must be much older than 2004 . BIN IT.
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#3 Serge Teulon

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 05:51 PM

I agree with John!

As for whoever told you that you were stupid to shoot celluloid....sigh......well.....don't listen to them. It is the absolute right thing to do!!


S
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 08:30 PM

Hi all. I've just bought my first 16mm camera, an ARRI ST. I am planning on shooting the first section of my feature on it.
I've been given an unopened 400ft roll of Ektachrome 7240 single perf by a friend, who bought it around 2004, as a present to shoot the film on. I'd like to use the reversal stock for something as he admits that he probably will never.
a) I don't have a 400ft mag at the moment, so I'm worried about destroying the film. Is it possible to get a lab to cut it down and put it onto 100ft daylight loading spools?
B) what happens if the film is f*cked? Can I get it clip tested? It hasn't been opened at all, but it also hasn't been kept in a fridge

4 years is a long time to keep COlour film. In the freezer it might be OK. AT room temperature a negative film might be corectable. A reversal film may be on at least the edge of not being corectable in vidoe transfer.

Personaly I would try to run a roll of fresh B&W reversal to shake down the camera, and look at it directly with a projector or even a magnifier. Nice sharp staedy inages from that test would vindicate that the camera is in good condition. if I get a new unit from e-aby the first film test I tend to do is to shoot 5 feet of Film and delvelop it in the darkroom, a sharp steady image is a sign that I can ruin further tests.

Ask the lab if they can run a clip test. (they may tell you that stock that old is hopeless.) I did get some good results from a roll of US surplus VNF that had been frozen by the seller, and was surprised when I checked the date code that it was 15 years old. Not perfect results you understand but they would have been correctable in a video transfer. (colour was not prime) My wife enjoyed seeing our dog run an agility run when projected.

MOst labs will be happy to re-roll stock on to daylight spools for anywhere from "free" to 10 bucks a roll. It is not a big deal with a set of rewinds, a split reel and a spare 400 ft daylight spool (or a second split reel and core) to hold the film while you swap ends.
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#5 Freya Black

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 05:17 AM

They are right it's not worth paying all the lab costs to get this film processed.

However...

VNF is a variation of E6 and lots of people have had luck home processing VNF film in cheap E6 processing kits, so my recomendation would be to use it for some strange bunch of experiments and to process it yourself, or to sell the roll on e-bay to someone who is into that kind of thing (you won't get loads for it, probably about $10 but every little helps and at least the film won't go to waste).

The film is unlikely to be right at this point but it might provide some intresting weirdness for someone.

love

Freya
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