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lighting in a small studio


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#1 Maggie Twomey

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 01:51 PM

hi,

I shoot regularly in a small studio (it's actually a small room, probably 12*15) and after shooting everything in front of a black screen (total eclipse, that is) for a couple of months, I am looking for ways to make it more interesting.

Essentially it has 1 black wall and 2 white walls. But it is very small, almost too small for a green screen setup -- so what would you guys do if this is your only place for shooting interviews?


M.T
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#2 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 08:59 AM

I've shot green screen in TINY spaces. Dr.'s office type small. You can do it. That gives you infinite background possibilities.

Also, you can get some colored seamless or something like that. Go to a photo store and check out their backdrops.
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#3 Walter Graff

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 09:35 AM

I agree 12x15 is plenty of room for green screen. Give it a try, you'll have all the backgrounds you want.
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#4 Maggie Twomey

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 11:27 AM

hi all,

thanks for the response -- I just measured and the room is like 12*13, not 15

I've tried shooting green screen, but my main problem is somehow the lights aren't even on the green screen, and that causes some problems when keying out the green. I have 2 1ks, 2 300s (fresnel) and 2 pro lights. How do I light the green evenly and still keep the talent lit and also distant from the Green? (there was some spill over last time I shot)

I appreciate any suggestions... thanks!!!

M.T
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#5 Walter Graff

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 01:15 PM

Go to the Home Depot and buy two 4 foot workshop lights and have someone wire them so You can plug them in to a socket. Then mount one on each side of the room facing the screen. Your screen is lit. Use the other lights you have for the talent. Small rooms should have no effect on making good green screen.

I designed a situation for a major sports network last year. We have 9+ locations around the globe that are basically small rooms in peoples homes where they pull down a green screen, turn on a light switch and sit in a chair. A remote camera shoots them for various sports related shows. These are well known sports witters. The idea is it was easier to set up a portable/ permanent studio in their home than have them either constantly come to a studio to do a feed or have a truck come to their house. All use green screen and various backgrounds are inserted into the shot as if they are in the studio.Here are a few shots. Keep in mind this room is smaller than the one you are working in:

sports1.jpg
sports2.jpg
sports3.jpg
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#6 Nick Norton

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Posted 24 June 2008 - 02:06 AM

I am also concerned with turning a small room (my studio apartment) into a functioning studio.

My room measures 10' wide, 12' long, and 7.5' tall.

Using Fresnels, will this space allow me enough room to study/experiment with lighting setups, etc.?


Thanks-

Nicholas
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#7 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:19 AM

hi,

I shoot regularly in a small studio (it's actually a small room, probably 12*15) and after shooting everything in front of a black screen (total eclipse, that is) for a couple of months, I am looking for ways to make it more interesting.

Essentially it has 1 black wall and 2 white walls. But it is very small, almost too small for a green screen setup -- so what would you guys do if this is your only place for shooting interviews?


M.T


Don't forget that you don't always need to fill you camera view with the screen. although that is most convenient in post, you could have just enough green screen for you talent and then use a garbage matte during editing to remove the rest of your background.
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Visual Products

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Glidecam

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New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

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Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

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