Jump to content


Photo

Canon Scoopic M/MS opinions


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Roger Richards

Roger Richards
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Producer

Posted 21 June 2008 - 01:13 PM

Hi everyone, I am looking for views on the Canon Scoopic cameras for use as an MOS camera. I received some advice that this camera was a good one for use as a b-roll MOS unit, and it has remained in my mind, so I am asking for any other opinions. Thanks.
  • 0

#2 Mark Schlicher

Mark Schlicher
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Nashville, TN USA

Posted 07 July 2008 - 12:56 PM

Hi everyone, I am looking for views on the Canon Scoopic cameras for use as an MOS camera. I received some advice that this camera was a good one for use as a b-roll MOS unit, and it has remained in my mind, so I am asking for any other opinions. Thanks.


Scoopic M/MS cameras in good condition are good mos b-cameras, much better than the original scoopic. Optics are good, though the zoom range is limited. I had one a few years ago (about 8) and couldn't find anyone who could service mine properly. Parts are almost impossible to find. If you find someone who is servicing the camera they are possibly relying on cannibalized used parts.

Unless you need the small size, you might be better served by purchasing a CP16R (or R/A). Solid camera, chrystal sync, 400 foot mags, lots of parts available, competent techs (Ken Hale and Whitehouse AV, Paul Hillman at Visual Products), and the camera can be bought very inexpensively these days.The Scoopic M does have the advantage of shooting 64FPS but with 50 ft daylight spools it is not necessarily a pleasant experience in terms of constant reloads!
  • 0

#3 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 07 July 2008 - 01:59 PM

There are several advantages of a Scoopic M/MS/MN,

1) Very portable and easy to use, IMO a great MOS run-and-gun camera. This is not a Super 8 camera, but it practically functions as one as far as ease of use.

2) Autoexposure; in quick situations having it built-in is great. I usually set it and flip to manual to avoid breathing, although I haven't noticed breathing even in auto that much.

3) I haven't found the limit on battery life yet. I've shot (8) 100' rolls and still had juice leftover. This is on the built-in battery, one that has been re-celled of course.

4) Loading is the easiest 16mm 100' load camera I've ever used. Auto feed rules.

I've had a colorist ask me several times about what camera/lens combination I used while working on some State Fair of Texas footage. She couldn't believe how steady and sharp it looked. That was with Vision2 50D on a sunny day so it was some great conditions, but I have found that in the middle f-stop range the lens is excellent.

As far as repairs, Bernie O'Doherty at Super 16, Inc. worked on mine for regular maintenance without undue expense or issue, but I haven't had anything major go wrong with it (built like a tank.)

Negatives would be:

1) Can be loud & squeaky even after regular maintenance.

2) At the f-stop extremes the lens goes soft

3) Super 16 conversion possible (against popular belief), but extremely time consuming & expensive. Be prepared to spend 3 to 4 times what the camera costs to make it Super 16 and therefore not very practical for conversion.
  • 0

#4 Roger Richards

Roger Richards
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Producer

Posted 24 July 2008 - 02:55 PM

Will and Mark,

Thanks very much for your replies. I actually found a Scoopic M in very good condition that had recently been serviced, with an excellent battery. This is a b-roll MOS camera for me, to be combined with HD. Let's see how I can do with it. This is my first motion film camera.


There are several advantages of a Scoopic M/MS/MN,

1) Very portable and easy to use, IMO a great MOS run-and-gun camera. This is not a Super 8 camera, but it practically functions as one as far as ease of use.

2) Autoexposure; in quick situations having it built-in is great. I usually set it and flip to manual to avoid breathing, although I haven't noticed breathing even in auto that much.

3) I haven't found the limit on battery life yet. I've shot (8) 100' rolls and still had juice leftover. This is on the built-in battery, one that has been re-celled of course.

4) Loading is the easiest 16mm 100' load camera I've ever used. Auto feed rules.

I've had a colorist ask me several times about what camera/lens combination I used while working on some State Fair of Texas footage. She couldn't believe how steady and sharp it looked. That was with Vision2 50D on a sunny day so it was some great conditions, but I have found that in the middle f-stop range the lens is excellent.

As far as repairs, Bernie O'Doherty at Super 16, Inc. worked on mine for regular maintenance without undue expense or issue, but I haven't had anything major go wrong with it (built like a tank.)

Negatives would be:

1) Can be loud & squeaky even after regular maintenance.

2) At the f-stop extremes the lens goes soft

3) Super 16 conversion possible (against popular belief), but extremely time consuming & expensive. Be prepared to spend 3 to 4 times what the camera costs to make it Super 16 and therefore not very practical for conversion.


  • 0


Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Opal

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Metropolis Post

The Slider

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery