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#1 Rich Hibner

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 03:25 AM

Hey...say when you do a scene indoors and you have lights in the background showing or lights in general...aka...lamps and such...do you require a certain lamp shade or a certain bulb for the lamps? Just curious. I was watching a scene in a movie where they had at least 3 lamps in the background and wanted to ask.
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#2 David Auner aac

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 04:03 AM

Hi Rich,

lights seen in the shot are generally referred to as practicals. Usually you'd use photo flood bulbs in those on put them on dimmers. Be aware of the max. wattage of the sockets. Might need to use ceramic or brass one instead of the normal plastic stuff. The cheap plastic one usually max out at 60W.

BTW it might be a good idea for you to get one of the lighting books listed on the forum and have a thorough read. Most of these questions you're asking will be dealt with much more in depth than we can do in posts here. Harry C. Box Set Lighting Technician is one of my favorite lighting books.

Cheers, Dave
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#3 Rich Hibner

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 04:32 AM

Thanks I appreciate your input.....

I might give that book a shot sometime.
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#4 David Regan

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 09:08 AM

It's a good point you ask about lampshades, because that can really make a difference. I had the experience of not really noticing this old faded lampshade in the BG once, and although I went through and switched out all the bulbs to balanced ones, when I got the film back, this lampshade was a really nasty shade (No pun in intended) of yellow in the BG of the shot. So it certainly is a good thing to work with your production designer or art director, and make sure you aren't just throwing on any old lampshade in the house.

Edited by David Regan, 22 June 2008 - 09:10 AM.

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#5 John Holland

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 11:18 AM

This must depend on what you are shooting on film/ or hd/video . 500 iso film 60- 100 watt bulb are more than enough , if some crap video cam. prob . 40-60 max .
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#6 David Rakoczy

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 03:07 PM

Another thing to watch for is the Shade's Shadow... when (your) lighting throws a shadow on a wall from a lamp that is 'on'... in frame... Lamps that are 'on' [usually] won't throw a shadow on the wall.. unless there is a bright source out of frame to justify it... emphasis on 'usually'. But if that Lamp is supposed to be the 'source' it had better not be casting a shadow.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post