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Achieving the look


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#1 Anton Verho

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 04:04 PM

Hello,

I'm shooting my first 16mm project in the end of july. Its a student-shortfilm placed in 1930s countryside.
We´re planning to shoot on 7201 (50D) and 7205 (250D), and the new 7219 (500T) for nighttime. Our budget can handle one-light transfer for 2K.

I wish to achieve a desaturated, "washed out" look for the film. Ive attached a photo reference.
its now and then used in advertisements, like at this dhl ad

Does anyone have experience or advices on such as emulsions, rating the film, filters, post?
Also, is there a commonly used name to refer to this look. Other than desaturated, that is.. Where/How has this look originated?
Thanks very much!

Best regards,
Anton Verho
Finland
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 08:28 PM

What I would recommend remembering would be that you are only as good as what you've shot. NOt meaning the footage proper, but what you're actually recording. To get desaturation, shoot desaturated stuff! No strong primaries and the like. Also Atmospheric things like smoke/haze (filter or otherwise) may well help.
I mean, it's not too hard to desaturated an image in post, overall, and if you can, try shooting 100ft or so of each negative and just doing a quick test correction on it overall. It might cost some money up front but it can identify problems you might have later on in your workflow/locations/production design/stocks.
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#3 Annemarie van Basten

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 07:24 AM

i understand that filters can help. but is there a specific type of filter in order to greate a desaturated / bleached look?. what would be it's proper name/names of the filter. (if anyone can help)

:unsure:

Edited by Annemarie van Basten, 23 July 2008 - 07:25 AM.

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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 09:19 AM

I don't know of any filter for that. Desaturatin/Bleach look is generally done @ the lab or in the color correction. You can over-expose the negative which will lower contrast and to a certain degree desaturate, but those things are best left in post for better control IMHO and AFAIK .
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#5 John Holland

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 10:37 AM

If you over expose you will get a more saturated look , if you are brave enough to underexpose 1/1/2 to 2 stops you will end up with a thinner neg so less colour . I agree about the art direction use pastel shades .
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#6 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 05:58 PM

i think ultra contrast filters tend to lower contrasts and desaturate the colors a bit. i personally don´t like them and would recommend a pull-process to desaturate colors and get a pastel look, if it´s what you want to get...
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The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineLab