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48 Hour Film Project


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#1 Cory Lonas

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 10:43 AM

Yesterday we wrapped on our 48 Hour Film "In The Cards" it was a hell of a journey. if you havent heard of it(I didnt until I was asked to join the team) Its a film festival in which you have to write shoot and edit a 3-7 minute film in a 48 hour time frame... a lot of fun and I got a lot of great experience. the DP I worked with was a helpful in answering my questions without hesitation and givinh me all the information I would need to know for the shoot.... overall Im real tired and Im gonna go back to sleep for a while...
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#2 Adus Dorsey II

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 03:35 PM

Yesterday we wrapped on our 48 Hour Film "In The Cards" it was a hell of a journey. if you havent heard of it(I didnt until I was asked to join the team) Its a film festival in which you have to write shoot and edit a 3-7 minute film in a 48 hour time frame... a lot of fun and I got a lot of great experience. the DP I worked with was a helpful in answering my questions without hesitation and givinh me all the information I would need to know for the shoot.... overall Im real tired and Im gonna go back to sleep for a while...


Cory; I too worked on the 48 hour film project in Salt Lake with Eighth House Productions, and you are right it was an amazing experience. Do you know how your team did? Best of Luck with the final product.
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#3 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:01 PM

...you have to write shoot and edit a 3-7 minute film in a 48 hour time frame...


I take it this is a digital thing?
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:02 PM

As far as I know you can shoot whatever format you'd like. .. if you could get a fast enough turn 'round time on the stock/processing/dailies, you could shoot it on film.
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#5 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:07 PM

As far as I know you can shoot whatever format you'd like. .. if you could get a fast enough turn 'round time on the stock/processing/dailies, you could shoot it on film.


Well, I figured as much but something like that would be impossible for me since I have to ship out for processing and telecine.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:11 PM

Could one not shoot B/w Reversal and theoretically process/telecine it @ home? Given the right equipment?
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#7 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:18 PM

Could one not shoot B/w Reversal and theoretically process/telecine it @ home? Given the right equipment?


Well, technically, I could process any E6 film at home if I had the Kodak Processing Kit and a tub etc for running the film through the bath. I also could telecine it with an optical workprinter, if I still had one. Seems like a lot to go through though for some film festival. I'd rather take my time and shoot for film festivals that value quality over speed.
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:28 PM

Quite true, of course, Matt. Just something I thought up when I read your post. Personally, I think it'd be interesting to have a 96 hour Film-Film fest, must be shot on film!
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#9 Hal Smith

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:39 PM

Shoot with B&W negative film, process it at home, homebrew telecine it, and flip the image polarity in post. B&W negative is a lot more forgiving to shoot and process than either B&W reversal or E6 color.

I've successfully telecine'd some 35mm Looney Tunes with my 35mm KEM telecine. I recorded its Sony machine vision camera's S-video output on my Sony miniDV, and captured the tape into my Avid system. So I've got the backend of the workflow already on-line.
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#10 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 07:14 PM

Quite true, of course, Matt. Just something I thought up when I read your post. Personally, I think it'd be interesting to have a 96 hour Film-Film fest, must be shot on film!


Well, I would not shoot any other than film if I can help it. I really wish I had a lab here that could process my stock and offer telecine. If I had that option, I would gladly take up a challenge like that. Not to mention, I could shoot a feature complete with dailies, etc. Try having dailies when the nearest lab is like 3 days turnaround. Maybe you'd call them "Weeklies" instead?
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#11 Jason Anderson

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 07:53 PM

Shoot with B&W negative film, process it at home, homebrew telecine it, and flip the image polarity in post. B&W negative is a lot more forgiving to shoot and process than either B&W reversal or E6 color.

I've successfully telecine'd some 35mm Looney Tunes with my 35mm KEM telecine. I recorded its Sony machine vision camera's S-video output on my Sony miniDV, and captured the tape into my Avid system. So I've got the backend of the workflow already on-line.


Whats the quality like? There is only one telecine company in town and they do SD 4-4-4 to digital beta tape, no 2k or HD here in denver. I see a KEM on ebay for 2000 right now.

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#12 Hal Smith

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 10:52 PM

Whats the quality like? There is only one telecine company in town and they do SD 4-4-4 to digital beta tape, no 2k or HD here in denver. I see a KEM on ebay for 2000 right now.

Jason

When going through frames slowly in Avid you can tell that it isn't doing a 3:2 pulldown and there's a bit of "float" in the image since it uses a mirror shutter. The camera is pretty good at around 450 lines definition, definitely comparable to DV/miniDV video. It's not up to a true telecine in transfer quality but is great for edit transfers and non-critical use. I wouldn't hesitate to submit a film on DVD or tape to a festival that was transferred on it.

It's close enough to frame accurate to get a good EDL from your editing system, you'll always be within plus or minus one frame. Mine is setup for Super-35 but if you run the framing knob all the way to one end it ends up framed fairly closely to an Academy frame. It's probably a fairly simple matter to change the framing in a more official manner. If the one on eBay is listed by "sales-baron" it's coming from a shop in Hollywood that works on KEM's and he can give you contact information for the shop.
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