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Camera Stop Curves from Kodak


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#1 Chris Jordan

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 11:14 PM

Hello again,
I posted a question about Film Latitude earlier and I think I was a little bit confused about what I thought Film Latitude meant. Although I did get some good answers and I appreciate that, after doing some more research I found out something else on Kodak's website.

I found the following information listed under the Camera Stop Curves table on the Vision 200T film stock it states:


On the Characteristic-Camera Stop curve, the center point ("0") on the x-axis corresponds to a normal exposure of an 18-percent gray card in the red, green, and blue layers of this film. A white card is 2 1/3 stops higher than normal exposure. Anything more is overexposure latitude. A 3-percent black card is 2 2/3 stops below normal exposure. Anything less is underexposure latitude.

My question is this, Do I have only 2 1/3 stops higher and 2 2/3 stops lower, regardless of what the F stop is before it is over or under exposed. This seems to be the problem I was trying to figure out earlier, but again, I don't think I knew what I was talking about.

Any help would be great. I'm sure this is easy for most of you to understand and I would just like a little guidance.

Thank you for your time.
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#2 Paul Bruening

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 12:27 AM

http://en.wikipedia....posure_latitude which says:

Exposure latitude is the extent to which a light-sensitive material can be over or underexposed and still achieve an acceptable result. Since the acceptability of the result is dependent on both personal aesthetics and artistic intentions, the measurement of exposure latitude is by definition somewhat subjective. However, the relative values between different types of film are generally agreed upon: reversal film tends to have very little latitude, while color negative film has considerably more.

It is not to be confused with dynamic range, which is, in photographic context, the range of light intensities a medium can capture. A recording medium with greater dynamic range will be able to record more details in the dark and light areas of a picture. Latitude depends on dynamic range. If the same scene can be recorded using less than the full brightness range available to the medium, the exposure can be shifted along the range without clipping data values in the shadows or highlights. Greater exposure latitude allows one to compensate for errors in exposure while retaining quality.

In the advancement of digital cinematography, expanding the exposure latitude is a critical ingredient which has often been a central part of professional critiques of the new camera systems.
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Ritter Battery

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Technodolly

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