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#1 Arshad Ali

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 08:45 AM

Hello

This is Arshad. I am a software engineer by profession right now. I am fond of photography. I have a desperate desire to become a Movie director. When I think about cameras my creative sense starts glowing. I want to covert this glow to Fire.

Right now my conditions not allow me to enter into this field directly. I cant even start any professional course rite now. But I want to START of my own.

In short the question is that "How should I coach my self"? That is the only reason I have joined this forum.


Seeking Guidance
Arshad.
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#2 Chance Shirley

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:11 AM

In short the question is that "How should I coach my self"?


Watch movies. Preferably well-directed ones. Pay attention to how the directors use shot selection and edits to tell their stories.

Then get yourself an inexpensive camera and a couple of friends and start making your own movies.
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#3 John Hoffler

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:21 AM

read and study! and practice! I've learned SO much in the last year from reading as many books as I can get my hands on and going out and shooting anything! 35mm stills/MiniDV shorts, anything!

I recommend Cinematography: Theory and Practice and Motion Picture and Video Lighting by Blain Brown
Cinematography: Third Addition by Kris Malkiewitz and M. David Mullen, Film Directing: Shot by Shot by Stephen Katz


and a lot more that are listed in the Recommended Books section of the forum.

Watch a lot of commentaries on DVD's as well!

that's my two cents... I was self taught until last year and now am in school and these resources (cine.com + books and DVD's) taught me more than the first few months in school!

good luck!

Edited by John Hoffler, 26 June 2008 - 09:21 AM.

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#4 Ram Shani

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:30 AM

your passion is every thing
books are great but as add on

you should see as many movies as you can

and shoot shoot shoot

if you can get hold of cam like the canon hv-20 which is great cam for like 600$
shoot and edit your staff. you will see how fast you learn
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#5 Ayz Waraich

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 02:00 PM

Watch a lot of commentaries on DVD's as well!


I wholeheartedly second that.

Also, watch as many movies that you can back to back. 2-3 a day if you can. Take a vacation if you have to. But spend a couple of weeks doing nothing but watching movies/commentaries. You'll be surprised by how quickly you'll pick up the language and the skills if you immerse yourself like that.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 02:56 PM

I would also add in to watch some of the worst movies ever, and try to figure out why they failed (Manos: Hands of Fate) comes to mind!
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#7 Rich Hibner

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:28 PM

Any movies with commentary anyone would like to suggest?

-Rh
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#8 Ayz Waraich

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 05:01 PM

Any movies with commentary anyone would like to suggest?

-Rh


David Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson, Steven Soderberg, and Ridley Scott usually have something interesting to say about their filmmaking process on their commentaries. For lower-budget stuff... Anything by Robert Rodriguez.

There's many others, but i'm having a brain-freeze.
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#9 abel alvarado

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 05:25 PM

read and study! and practice! I've learned SO much in the last year from reading as many books as I can get my hands on and going out and shooting anything! 35mm stills/MiniDV shorts, anything!

I recommend Cinematography: Theory and Practice and Motion Picture and Video Lighting by Blain Brown
Cinematography: Third Addition by Kris Malkiewitz and M. David Mullen, Film Directing: Shot by Shot by Stephen Katz


and a lot more that are listed in the Recommended Books section of the forum.

Watch a lot of commentaries on DVD's as well!

that's my two cents... I was self taught until last year and now am in school and these resources (cine.com + books and DVD's) taught me more than the first few months in school!

good luck!



awesome nice advice im goin to check out this books as soon as i can! :lol:
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#10 Arshad Ali

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 05:06 AM

Watch movies. Preferably well-directed ones. Pay attention to how the directors use shot selection and edits to tell their stories.

Then get yourself an inexpensive camera and a couple of friends and start making your own movies.



Thanks Chance..!! :rolleyes:
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#11 Arshad Ali

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 05:45 AM

read and study! and practice! I've learned SO much in the last year from reading as many books as I can get my hands on and going out and shooting anything! 35mm stills/MiniDV shorts, anything!

I recommend Cinematography: Theory and Practice and Motion Picture and Video Lighting by Blain Brown
Cinematography: Third Addition by Kris Malkiewitz and M. David Mullen, Film Directing: Shot by Shot by Stephen Katz


and a lot more that are listed in the Recommended Books section of the forum.

Watch a lot of commentaries on DVD's as well!

that's my two cents... I was self taught until last year and now am in school and these resources (cine.com + books and DVD's) taught me more than the first few months in school!

good luck!



Thank you John...!! It was a great advice..!!
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#12 John Hoffler

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 04:33 PM

I would also reiterate that going out and shooting ANYTHING at all is the most invaluable tool ever. Once I started going out and shooting just simple setups, I learned 10 times faster.


some of my favorite commentaries are:

American Beauty (Sam Mendes and Conrad Hall)
Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola) - actually most of his are good (Godfather 1 &2)
Requiem for a Dream (both Aranofsky's and Libatique's)
Taxi Driver (Scorsese)
Dark City (Roger Ebert)
Citizen Kane (Roger Ebert)
Memento (Christopher Nolan)
Following (Christopher Nolan - his first low budget feature in B&W)
Boogie Nights (P.T. Anderson)
Amadeus (Milos Forman)
Aliens (James Cameron and Cast/Crew)
Primer (Shane Carruth - film made for under $10,000)
Heat (Michael Mann)
Seven (David Fincher and Darius Khonji's)

a BUNCH of Criterion DVD's have excellent commentaries as well!

while not every one of these is SUPER educational, they are the ones I find myself listening too more than once...

I hate when Director's or DP's on commentaries just kind of mumble about some guy they met, and where there were good sandwiches near a location, or just dote praise on their lead actor without telling you anything informational.

or the "long pause" while they just watch it with you... ugh!

and I second Ram's post.... you have to have a passion for it!!

Edited by John Hoffler, 27 June 2008 - 04:37 PM.

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#13 Benson Marks

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 12:33 AM

Do what I did, read Dov S.S. Simens book "From Reel To Deal." Not only will it teach you what the director does, but also how the entire filmmaking process works. I should warn you, though, that it was copyrighted 2003, so it's a little old. But it is a very excellent learning tool.
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#14 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 03:22 AM

Ya know yu mentioned in your first post, you weren't able to enter the field directly but with all due respect, that's not entirely true. The FIRST rule of indy film making is use what ya got!!! Well what is it you got? You GOT an significant knowledge of computers and access to a lot of computers. " So What " you say, "What has that got to do wuth turning my dream of making a movie into a reality??!!" Well I'll tell you what that has to do with making your dream a reality. You're a software developer. You now computers inside and out. might I recommend computer animation. You can do it right on you computer at home, you already have a strong working knowledge of programming so graphics should come easy to you and you should be able to pick them up very quickly. I would recommend Lightwave or Maya but you can even start with Blender:

http://www.blender.org/

which is a free animation program you just download. It was originally designed as a gaming program and the learning curve is a little steep but I learned on it so pretty much anyone can. Another free program is Terragen:

http://www.planetside.co.uk/terragen/

which is used to create 3d landscapes and MAN for freeware programs just take LOOK at what these puppies can do!!!!

Other commercial programs are Poser, Bryce, Studio Max 3D and the list goes on but those are the biggies. I personally use Lightwave and it is utterly amazing, You have virtual cameras and lights, you set the lenses, it's exactly like having your own virtual set and you can learn a LOT from computer animation. Don't believe you can make a movie like this? Let me COUNT the ways!:

Toy Story
Cars
Shrek
Final Fantasy
The Incredibles
The Polar Express
A.Li.Ce
Alibaba
The Ant Bully 0
Antz
Appleseed
Appurushîdo
Appleseed Ex Machina
Ard Al Taaf
Ark
Arthur and the Minimoys aka. Arthur and the Invisibles
Atagoal: Cat's Magical Forest

Back to Gaya aka. The Snurks
Barnyard
The Bee Julia and Mrs. Vita
L'Apetta Giulia e la signora Vita
Bee Movie
Beowulf
Bonobono: Kumomo no Ki no Koto
A Bug's Life

Cars
Cassiopéia
Chicken Little

Delgo
Dragons: Destiny of Fire

Una Película de huevos
Egon & Dönci
Elias and the Royal Yacht
Elysium
The Emperor's Secret
Especial
Everyone's Hero

Final Fantasy VII Advent Children
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within
Finding Nemo
Flushed Away
Fly Me to the Moon
Free Jimmy

Happily N'Ever After
Happy Feet
Hoodwinked
Horton Hears a Who!

Ice Age
Ice Age: The Meltdown
Igor
Impy's Island
The Incredibles

Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius
Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie

Kaena: The Prophecy
Khan Kluay
Kung Fu Panda
Little Vuk

The Living Forest

Madagascar
The Magic Roundabout aka. Doogal
Meet the Robinsons
Midsummer Dream
Monsters, Inc.
Monster House

Nak

Open Season
Over the Hedge

Pinocchio
Pirates in the Pacific
The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: A VeggieTales Movie
The Polar Express

Ratatouille
Robots

Shark Bait
Shark Tale
Shrek
Shrek 2
Shrek the Third
Space Chimps
Spirit of the Forest
Star Wars: The Clone Wars
Sunshine Barry & The Disco Worms
Surf's Up

Terkel in Trouble
Terra
TMNT
Toy Story
Toy Story 2

The Ugly Duckling and Me!
Thru the Moebius Strip

Valiant
Vexille

WALL-E
The Wild
Winx Club - The Secret of the Lost Reign

And THAT'S just the 3d animation!! Here's the ones that are coming up:

Around the World in 50 Years
The Bear and the Bow
Bolt
Calling All Robots
A Christmas Carol
Citizen Siege
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs
The Fake Hero
Frog Paradise
Goat Story - The Old Prague Legends
The Golden Donkey
Holy Night!
How to Train Your Dragon
Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs In Search of Oniria
En Busca de Oniria
Jack and Ben's Animated Adventure
Krakatuk
Кракатук
Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa
Monsters vs. Aliens
Neanderthals
Newt
Planet 51
Plumíferos
Punk Farm
Puss in Boots: The Story of an Ogre Killer
Rapunzel
Resident Evil: Degeneration
Biohazard: Degeneration
Roadside Romeo
Sapsan
Shrek Goes Fourth
Shrek 5
Spike and Suzy: The Texas Rangers
Sultan the Warrior
Sword-bearer's Heart
Сердце Оруженосца (Serdtse Oruzhinostsa)
Tale of Despereaux
Toy Story 3
Up
The Wild Bunch
Yona Yona Penguin

Never say never. If you want to make a movie NOTHING will stand in your way unless you allow it to. Get a decent graphics card with dual monitor setup al FAST processor or 4, loads of ram and hard drive space and if ya want to get REAL fancy set up a small render farm. Get a copy of Photoshop, and and editing software program like Premiere and go to town. Write a script, RE_WRITE IT till it's good. have a couple of good actors do the voices while you video tape them, create the animation based on their movements and expressions, add sound FX, music and titles AND whola!! YOU, my friend have just made a film! B)
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#15 JJ Garcia

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 10:27 AM

Good advice all, even if it were bad i wouldn't know the difference, or for now at least. Thanks for posting that question Arshad.

I was watching commentaries on the movie "Snatch" by Guy Ritchie and they talked about how they made the movie, i thought it was very interesting.

JJ
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#16 JJ Garcia

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 10:48 AM

Not "Snatch" but "Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels"
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