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Various Bars and Restauraunts


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#1 Steve McBride

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 11:15 AM

For an upcoming short, most of the scenes will take place in bars and restauraunts that have bars. For the first scene, there will be a slow tracking in shot to set up the scene and then dialogue between two characters. I'm confused as to how to light it.

I want the brownish/ redish look in the wooden bars, chairs, tables, etc. so I'll mostly use tungsten lights, but as to the position and strength of the lights I'm am basically clueless. For the tracking shot I'll probably just set up some sort of omni lights, possibly some china light's or balloon lights (maybe that's completely wrong), and then set up three point lighting for the dialogue. I'm just worried that the dialogue will look completely different from the tracking shot, as you will see the characters in the tracking shot, the lighting cannot be radically different.

Any help is greatly appreciated!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 11:21 AM

Light the space first, thinking about the best places for lights in terms of how they fall on the actors, so that when you move in for close-ups, you don't have to relight completely, just "tweak" -- i.e. if the light in the wide shot was a little too high and hard for the faces up close, you can lower it a little and soften it a little for the close-ups. But don't think of it as generic "three point lighting."

Your choices tend to always be the same in bars, etc. -- light from above (soft, or maybe a row of small spots), light from below (like Kino tubes on the counter or below), or light from the side. First see if you can augment the levels of what is already there. For example, if the bar has some overhead bulbs, maybe they can be swapped for something higher wattage or spottier.

Chinese Lanterns, Dedolights, and Kinos are always useful in bars.
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#3 David Rakoczy

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 02:13 PM

ND gels work great over Neon Signs.. to keep them in the 'range' when needed. Just wrap a large sheet over them... uptight they look like a Neon with a Gel wrapped over it... back off a bit and they look fantastic. Enjoy the shoot. Try to stay away from the Tap! I shot a piece of fece a long time ago with a horrible Producer and Director. While in the bar I kept going to a longer and longer lens and dollying back and back until I was butted up against the bar where my Dolly Grip could begin the mixing process. The Scotch helped (us) get through the day.... and yes to all the nay-sayers... the footage was beautiful despite our (then) happy spirits.

Edited by David Rakoczy, 27 June 2008 - 02:14 PM.

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#4 Steve McBride

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 08:23 PM

Light the space first, thinking about the best places for lights in terms of how they fall on the actors, so that when you move in for close-ups, you don't have to relight completely, just "tweak" -- i.e. if the light in the wide shot was a little too high and hard for the faces up close, you can lower it a little and soften it a little for the close-ups. But don't think of it as generic "three point lighting."

Your choices tend to always be the same in bars, etc. -- light from above (soft, or maybe a row of small spots), light from below (like Kino tubes on the counter or below), or light from the side. First see if you can augment the levels of what is already there. For example, if the bar has some overhead bulbs, maybe they can be swapped for something higher wattage or spottier.

Chinese Lanterns, Dedolights, and Kinos are always useful in bars.

Thanks for the tips. Chinese lanterns above the tables is what I was thinking about doing and then maybe some spots on main characters.

And to the other David, I'm only 19 so I'm not going to be able to hit up the bar during the shoot... So I'll most likely have to turn to energy drinks or something... The tip with the ND filter will definitely come in handy, thanks!
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 07:19 AM

Thanks for the tips. Chinese lanterns above the tables is what I was thinking about doing and then maybe some spots on main characters.

And to the other David, I'm only 19 so I'm not going to be able to hit up the bar during the shoot... So I'll most likely have to turn to energy drinks or something... The tip with the ND filter will definitely come in handy, thanks!


Steve,

Keep your head on Straight... I only mentioned that story as it was a long long time ago. A long time ago. I no longer put myself in a position where I hate what I am doing and if the tables suddenly turn and I do find myself there I simply walk...

Depending on where the bar is supposed to be located... Smoke can play an intricate part in creating ambiance.
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#6 Steve McBride

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 07:29 PM

Steve,

Keep your head on Straight... I only mentioned that story as it was a long long time ago. A long time ago. I no longer put myself in a position where I hate what I am doing and if the tables suddenly turn and I do find myself there I simply walk...

Depending on where the bar is supposed to be located... Smoke can play an intricate part in creating ambiance.

Heh, guess my sarcasm didn't carry over the internet. And thanks for the idea with the smoke, that's very true and I can get some cool lighting effects with it.
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Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

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