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Departures TV show


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#1 Mark Norman

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:31 PM

Departures is a show that follows travelers Scott and Justin around the world.

Andre Dupuis is director and director of photography.

I am continually stunned at how lush the images are in this show.

Can anyone tell me more about the camera pictured below? (Justin left, Andre right)

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:43 PM

Looks like a Pannasonic HVX200 to me
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#3 Tom Lowe

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 01:10 AM

Looks like a Pannasonic HVX200 to me


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#4 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 11:25 AM

Agree, Panasonic HVX-200, Matte Box and shotgun...


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#5 Mike Sorel

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 11:24 AM

I have watched Departures a few times and I am always impressed by the cinematography and cinematic feel the images convey. But I have to say what impresses me most is the coverage Andre the DP and Director gets on his own, every scene has lots of coverage and isn't boring at all. So if Andre is out there I'd like to hear how he approaches shooting a scene?
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#6 Andre Dupuis

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 09:29 PM

I have watched Departures a few times and I am always impressed by the cinematography and cinematic feel the images convey. But I have to say what impresses me most is the coverage Andre the DP and Director gets on his own, every scene has lots of coverage and isn't boring at all. So if Andre is out there I'd like to hear how he approaches shooting a scene?


Hey Mike,

Thanks for watching the show! How do I approach the scene? I just shoot a TON of stuff and try to do it with whatever little time I have. Usually this involves me running around and switching often between the steadicam and the little tripod we have. Variety is key too: Close ups, super wide shots, some slow motion, high shutter. I get static tripod shots, some slow steadicam pushes etc. Using the HVX200 is awesome. The scene mode dial on the back is crucial for working quickly. Often I have to decide where the scene is going and make all my decisions of what to shoot or what not to shoot on that. I end up doing alot of editing in the field this way omitting the useless stuff and focusing on what I think would make the most interesting TV. This is hard sometimes because the little insignificant thing sometimes blows up into a big story element and I kick myself for not covering it.

The mood of the places I shoot is my biggest motivator. Tv is flat and its impossible with how limited photography is to give you the experience of being there. What is smells like, what the sun feels like on your skin. Im so motivated to find a creative way to convey all that I can with what limited tools we have. Steadicam shots convey 3d space very well for example, where with a static shot you would never get a sense how HUGE that mountain really is. Sometimes when i see something with my eyes that is really beautiful i just close one eye to kill the depth im seeing, if its still beautiful ill shoot it. If the mood feels off I may shoot handheld and be a little sloppy with my framing. I also make use of a pol. to make the sky sexier (and sometimes to fit mood ill take the pol. out if i want the sky to look pale) I also use a grad. ND9 to correct the limitations of the camera lattitude, darken the sky so you can see all the detail. Im very stoked for the day when TV is 3D and HDR and 20+ megapixel :) It would make my job easier!

andre
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#7 Kar Wai Ng

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 10:06 PM

Hi Andre,

It's a pleasure to have you on the board. I too have been watching the series and have been very much impressed by how well shot it is and the polish it has. I really love the poignancy of the overcranked shots. The coverage is pretty amazing too; I remember watching the whole 3-wheel rickshaw race sequence in India and being amazed it was shot with just one camera. Since I started watching the series since the first episode, I've been wondering about several other things, mostly related to logistics...

Since it was just the three of you guys travelling (presumably without a support crew), how did you manage to schlepp everything you needed around with you? I would assume all the camera gear, batteries, steadicam gear, tripod, hard drives, etc, would amount to a pretty heavy backpack?

Also, what is the footage workflow like when you're travelling? Do you offload P2 cards with a laptop while you're on the go, do you bring a lot of hard drives with you, etc? Or did you courier footage back and forth so you're not lugging 50 lbs of hard drives around the world?
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#8 Mark Norman

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 08:03 PM

Departures Season 2 begins January 25th @ 7pm ET in Canada (OLN TV)

More info here

Congrats to Andre Dupuis for winning the Gemini Award for Best Photography!
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#9 Mark Norman

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 04:35 PM

The original image has changed, so here's a replacement (doesn't show the camera as well):
Posted Image
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#10 mark elford

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 11:37 PM

The original image has changed, so here's a replacement (doesn't show the camera as well):
Posted Image

i think the editing and video is one of the best i have seen in along time,plus the whole show is wonderful.i pass it on to alot of people.i watch as much as i can.i pick up some of the tricks from andre i hope.he has a natural talent for shooting.
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#11 Tim henry

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 12:20 AM

Andre,
I think your camera work is absolutely first rate and is definitely award winning calibre without a doubt your use of filters and capturing natural action is truly stunning.

Aside from that you definitely are involved in a fantastic show the young lady Giselle in Brazil anyway to contact her and what is her current status, sorry to ask but Im dying to know or if you could just have her contact me that'd be great.

Otherwise good luck with future shoots

Tim
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#12 Kirk Pflaum

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 11:39 PM

Also, what is the footage workflow like when you're travelling? Do you offload P2 cards with a laptop while you're on the go, do you bring a lot of hard drives with you, etc? Or did you courier footage back and forth so you're not lugging 50 lbs of hard drives around the world?



Yes, I was wondering the same thing, as I'm about to go away on a 6month shoot with a lot of traveling involved, I'm needing to find the
best/portable data workflow possible. Any more tips from this end Andre would be greatly appreciated! :)


Cheers, Kirk

www.kirkpflaum.co.nz
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#13 firestruck

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 04:10 PM

Hey Andre! I love the show and think your work is sickk. Would you be able to tell me what highschool you went to? My teacher said you went to our school but I don't know if he knows what he's talking about. Haha
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#14 Kyle Jones

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 02:02 PM

Hey Mike,
do you still use the hvx200, or have you made a switch

Thanks for watching the show! How do I approach the scene? I just shoot a TON of stuff and try to do it with whatever little time I have. Usually this involves me running around and switching often between the steadicam and the little tripod we have. Variety is key too: Close ups, super wide shots, some slow motion, high shutter. I get static tripod shots, some slow steadicam pushes etc. Using the HVX200 is awesome. The scene mode dial on the back is crucial for working quickly. Often I have to decide where the scene is going and make all my decisions of what to shoot or what not to shoot on that. I end up doing alot of editing in the field this way omitting the useless stuff and focusing on what I think would make the most interesting TV. This is hard sometimes because the little insignificant thing sometimes blows up into a big story element and I kick myself for not covering it.

The mood of the places I shoot is my biggest motivator. Tv is flat and its impossible with how limited photography is to give you the experience of being there. What is smells like, what the sun feels like on your skin. Im so motivated to find a creative way to convey all that I can with what limited tools we have. Steadicam shots convey 3d space very well for example, where with a static shot you would never get a sense how HUGE that mountain really is. Sometimes when i see something with my eyes that is really beautiful i just close one eye to kill the depth im seeing, if its still beautiful ill shoot it. If the mood feels off I may shoot handheld and be a little sloppy with my framing. I also make use of a pol. to make the sky sexier (and sometimes to fit mood ill take the pol. out if i want the sky to look pale) I also use a grad. ND9 to correct the limitations of the camera lattitude, darken the sky so you can see all the detail. Im very stoked for the day when TV is 3D and HDR and 20+ megapixel :) It would make my job easier!

andre


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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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