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desaturated look


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#1 vgshah

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 02:51 AM

hi,
i shot a film on Fuji. and got my first print which is fine in a conventional way. i want to try and achieve a desaturated look. any suggestion? if i can experiment with the print stock or while grading it. i am not going for di. so whatever i can try on analyzer or printing.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 11:49 AM

First, please go to My Controls and edit your Display Name to a real first and last name, as per the forum rules. Thanks.
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#3 vgshah

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 01:17 AM

hi,
i tried to go to My Controls and edit my Display Name to a real first and last name. dont know if its correct now. earlier too my display name was same as my real name. so ...
vivek
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 01:45 AM

hi,
i tried to go to My Controls and edit my Display Name to a real first and last name. dont know if its correct now. earlier too my display name was same as my real name. so ...
vivek


If your name is Vivek Shah, then why not change the Display Name to that?

Generally it's hard to simply make a desaturated print without going through some steps to create a desaturated printing negative as well.

For example, you could do a skip-bleach process to the print, which leaves black silver in the print, making the colors darker, less saturated, and increasing the contrast, lowering the shadow detail. You could experiment with using the Kodak teleprint stock, which is low contrast, to compensate for the increase in contrast, though I don't know if the teleprint is projectable in terms of color.

Otherwise, you need to lower the contrast first of the thing you make the skip-bleach print from, hence why it helps to have shot the negative with this in mind, like by flashing it. With a normal negative, it's hard to adjust the contrast of the print you make.

The more elaborate trick involves a contact printer -- you make a b&w positive from the original negative, and you make a color IP as well, then you create a new color dupe negative that is a combination of an exposure pass from the b&w positive and then the color positive. This way, you can control precisely how much color to let into the final image.

But nowadays, most people would do this in a D.I. and create a desaturated negative that way.
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