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Tech lingo..


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#1 Rich Hibner

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 03:38 PM

Why? Why can't an electrical cord be called an electrical cord on set? It's called that every where else in the world, almost. Must it be called a "stinger"....I had a guy almost lay it into me because I didn't call it a "stinger".

What else should I be aware of. I know of "flashing"...Again, Is it really difficult to distinguish a difference when a camera flashes and a bulb goign out?
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 03:41 PM

Oh there's lots of terms on set.


Personal Favorite : C-47!

I would assume the main reason would be to help keep things simpler. Instead of Extension Cord, stinger, for example.
Electrical cord would, IIRC be something different.
Then there's 550cord, Sash Cord (550 or Sash here in Philadelphia), etc.

Edited by Adrian Sierkowski, 03 July 2008 - 03:42 PM.

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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 04:57 PM

The reason is tradition and being part of a group, I guess. Just like in any other trade, essential items are refered to in a special way. It means the people who work in that trade all are part of a society or family, if you will. If one is not part of it, then that is that. One has to be able to learn the lingo used for that trade, or else one may have people wanting to lay it into one, as you found out.

Just like different countries have different languages and customs that differentiate their people from people in other parts of the world. If one wants to emigrate to another country, assimilation is required of one for the most part.

It also makes for efficiency on set. Crews all throughout the US and Canada know the same names for the same items (for the most part), so productions can get people from many different regions and still have a common working cohesiveness.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 03 July 2008 - 05:01 PM.

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#4 Alex Worster

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 05:00 PM

Although the lingo might seem a little nerdy at times, and it is, it does help you communicate better and more quickly on set thus it would be good to learn the lingo. There is plenty of time to joke around about how nerdy some words are though so don't worry.

Yes, it is very important in my opinion to call "flashing" before you take a flash photograph as it does look very similar to a globe blowing out. Furthermore, the electrics might get just a little annoyed after looking for the bulb that went out for 10 minutes when they finally find out it was a flash photograph. They might not hear you call "flashing" but someone will alert them when they start asking around if anyone saw a globe blow.
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#5 Anton Delfino

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 07:45 PM

are you kidding? 'electrical cord' sounds WAAAY nerdier than 'stinger' - hehe. Also, these special terms are usually department-specific. So when you hear a term that is specific to your department, you know it's for you and not for one of the dozens of people roaming around on set.

Besides, it's just fun to randomly yell out words like: butt plug, ubangi, pork chop, meat axe, tweenie, et al.

:)
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#6 John Hoffler

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 08:19 PM

i assume the "ubangi" is a duckbill clamp? I've also heard it called a "Jagger".

lol. I love our lingo!
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 08:30 PM

i assume the "ubangi" is a duckbill clamp? I've also heard it called a "Jagger".

lol. I love our lingo!


A ubangi is a mitchell offset for a dolly.
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#8 Rich Hibner

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 03:34 AM

Is there a cliffs notes of "tech terms" I can look up?
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#9 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 12:44 PM

Is there a cliffs notes of "tech terms" I can look up?


Try this:

http://www.msegrip.c...how=griptionary
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#10 Tim Terner

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 01:22 PM

Try this:

http://www.msegrip.c...how=griptionary


Great link Saul
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#11 Luc Allein

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 09:54 PM

Yeah, "c-47", ha ha. It's a friggin clothespin.

My buddy had an interesting experience like two weeks ago, he was working on some video or show that had Gary Coleman in it. So guess what happened when they were setting up, y'know....the smaller C Stands? Yeah, he heard it. Ha ha.

There's a newer lingo going around, it just keeps getting cheesier: "We're going to the beach" means "get dirt" aka "get sand bags". How silly. Im so glad I work in camera and dont have to deal with the grip lingo. It's easier to follow the language in Clockwork Orange than those guys, jesus.
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#12 John Hoffler

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 10:23 PM

A ubangi is a mitchell offset for a dolly.



oh, rock on!

I obviously have a lot of lingo to still learn!
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#13 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 10:42 PM

There's a newer lingo going around, it just keeps getting cheesier: "We're going to the beach" means "get dirt" aka "get sand bags".


Actually, "beach" is a very old term. I heard it for the first time a couple of years ago and some old timers told me me it was widely used in the seventies and eighties.
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#14 John Sprung

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 01:12 PM

Then there's 550cord, Sash Cord (550 or Sash here in Philadelphia), etc.

The name Sash Cord isn't movie jargon, it's what that kind of woven cord was originally called.

It came from the wooden window business, maybe a couple hundred years ago. Single and double hung windows -- the kind that open and close by sliding vertically -- are supposed to stay where you put them because the weight of the moving part of the window, called the Sash in window jargon, is balanced by hidden counterweights in the wall alongside it. The special cord made for that is, of course, sash cord. Real sash cord is a much better thing that the cheap crap they sell today in the box stores. It could last 50 - 100 years on well made windows.

There's also sash chain, originally made for the same purpose. Today we use it and call it grip chain. It's the stuff made from stamped pieces of sheet metal bent and linked together. They used brass sash chain on the best windows, the steel stuff we have now would rust out too quickly.



-- J.S.
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#15 John Holland

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 01:26 PM

John proper sash cord still in use here not on films/tv but windows as you said it also has a sort of waxy finish to it to help it run better on the runners .
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#16 JD Hartman

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 04:10 PM

"Pizza Box" for 2'X2' beadboard reflector. This one caught me off guard the other day. Is it a NYC regional term? I can't remember when pizza came in a box anywhere near that size.
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#17 John Sprung

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 05:28 PM

"Pizza Box" was the term used back in the 1" C video tape days for cardboard boxes used for short reels of tape. They were smaller than the ones used for food, but the construction was remarkably similar.



-- J.S.
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