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Lighting for 50D Film


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#1 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:08 PM

I think this light meter I rented here is broken,,,, it doesn't matter what ISO mode I set it to... I get the exact same readings of light no matter what.

ISO 25, and 800 are the same readings, or is that how its supposed to be?

this is a sekonic studio deluxe II (L-398m)

so my situation is:

I was really hoping to take my 50D vision 2 film out this weekend.

surely the light readings for 50D under broad daylight must be always the same, or have an average range, from what I hear its around F11 and F8 in the shade, or if some clouds are blocking the sun..

does any one have an average for broad daylight , and in the shade?

maybe some one could run out side if you have it sunny and take a quick reading for me! :lol:

I'm shooting with a K3 16mm, and it says the shutter speed is 1/60th of a second at 24 frames per second.

I'd use my digital camera but the lowest the ISO goes is 200, on my nikon D70s, so I'm not sure that would work!! :(


any help would be much appreciated!
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#2 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:15 PM

is ISO 200 for film the same as digital?

iso 50 is 2 stops below iso 200 right?

so maybe if I set my nikon for iso 200, and 1/60 shutter, and pull it under by 2 stops

i could go outside and see how things turn out at different F stops, wonder if that would work?
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:25 PM

To directly read f-stops from that meter, you must have the proper slide inserted. Since I assume you don't have slides, you need to read the needle of the meter for footcandles and then calculate a stop with the little wheelie apparatus on the back of the meter.
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#4 Jason Anderson

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:34 PM

is ISO 200 for film the same as digital?

iso 50 is 2 stops below iso 200 right?

so maybe if I set my nikon for iso 200, and 1/60 shutter, and pull it under by 2 stops

i could go outside and see how things turn out at different F stops, wonder if that would work?


Its based on how much light the objects in your scene reflect, so I can't imagine an average is very useful, maybe some of the shots will come out alright.

From 200 to 50 iso equals 2 stops, yes.

yes, your digital camera is made to emulate the sensitivity like film does for each iso setting.

A film camera with a 180* shutter angle will expose the film 1/48th of a second @ 24fps.

Jason
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 04:46 PM

The "sunny 16" rule says f/16 at 50 ASA at 1/50th of a second in direct sunlight. But shade varies a lot depending on how heavy it is -- generally you would open up by two stops for starters.
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#6 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 05:00 PM

there is 1 slide with this meter, its a High slide, i'm supposed to use it out side, and pull it out of the meter for indoors.

but yea, the light readings are the same no matter what anything is set for, whether its frame rates or ISO, in any combination.

you'd think the pointer would jump like crazy if I set the iso for 800 or more, but iso 25 is the same as 6,400 apparently lol
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 01:03 AM

there is 1 slide with this meter, its a High slide, i'm supposed to use it out side, and pull it out of the meter for indoors.

but yea, the light readings are the same no matter what anything is set for, whether its frame rates or ISO, in any combination.

you'd think the pointer would jump like crazy if I set the iso for 800 or more, but iso 25 is the same as 6,400 apparently lol


Which is why I told you how to use the meter. With the high slide in, you use the (I think) red set of fotcandle numbers of the back. The meter without any slide uses the black set.

The needle is going to say the same thing because there is one quantity of light, period. Setting the ISO on the calculator on the back does absolutely nothing to the workings of the measuring apparatus of the meter. On the wheelie calculator on the back you need to set the ISO/ASA. Then, read the stop that lines up with the shutter speed that you want. Done.

Edited by Chris Keth, 05 July 2008 - 01:04 AM.

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#8 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:43 AM

Which is why I told you how to use the meter. With the high slide in, you use the (I think) red set of fotcandle numbers of the back. The meter without any slide uses the black set.

The needle is going to say the same thing because there is one quantity of light, period. Setting the ISO on the calculator on the back does absolutely nothing to the workings of the measuring apparatus of the meter. On the wheelie calculator on the back you need to set the ISO/ASA. Then, read the stop that lines up with the shutter speed that you want. Done.



holy poop, is it this little tiny silver wheel? zero adjust? that's the only thing on the back, almost need a coin to turn it.

i never would have noticed that its so tiny, but that must be what your refering to right?

let me see if I can make use of it
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#9 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:53 AM

holy poop, is it this little tiny silver wheel? zero adjust? that's the only thing on the back, almost need a coin to turn it.

i never would have noticed that its so tiny, but that must be what your refering to right?

let me see if I can make use of it




hhahahahaha oh wait wait wait

god do I ever feel like an idiot lol.

Ok so the light readings are always the same, so basically you use the big round dial around with the red pointer and point it to where the reading was, and the on the bottom of the meter it tells you what fstop to use?
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#10 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 07:44 AM

this is way different than I thought it would be, but I think i got it now.

So I read 640 on the meter, I take the black dial and move it to 640 where the red H is, and at 1/60th of a second it tells me to use 16 and 2/3rds of a stop

then i read the low light in the shade, which says about 160, which results in 8 and 2/3rds of a stop

so my high = 16 and 2/3

low = 8 and 2/3

so I would want to use 11 and 2/3 since its right in the middle

does this sound right now?
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#11 Chris Keth

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 02:42 PM

That sounds like you're on the right track. You'll want to use the 1/50th of a second speed, unless you're using a camera with some other shutter speed.
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#12 Curtis Bouvier

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 06:03 PM

That sounds like you're on the right track. You'll want to use the 1/50th of a second speed, unless you're using a camera with some other shutter speed.


Yes, I've been hearing about cine24 being 1/48th of a second, but the manual and online both refer to the Krasnogorsk being 1/60th of a second shutter speed. Maybe if some one who's shot with the K3 could confirm?

http://www.k3camera.com/k3/k3tech.php

Edited by Curtis Bouvier, 05 July 2008 - 06:04 PM.

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#13 Chris Keth

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 08:29 PM

Yes, I've been hearing about cine24 being 1/48th of a second, but the manual and online both refer to the Krasnogorsk being 1/60th of a second shutter speed. Maybe if some one who's shot with the K3 could confirm?

http://www.k3camera.com/k3/k3tech.php


1/60th is correct for that camera. It's an oddball.
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#14 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 09:12 PM

I have used a digital rebel in a pinch and it worked fine. If your camera only goes down to 200, then you are correct about it being 2 stops faster than your 50D stock. So....take a photo at ISO 200, and instead of 1/48 (1/50) go to 1/200th. If you set your camera to Tv (shutter [time] priority), and set it to 1/200th, it will always tell you the stop it should be at. Be careful though, as some camera's only meter in spot/center weighted...etc. If you are aiming at the wrong thing you can get a wrong reading.
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#15 Andrew Koch

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 12:27 PM

so I would want to use 11 and 2/3 since its right in the middle
does this sound right now?


This is where you make creative choices. Averaging everything out is not always the best solution. You could expose for the highlights and make the shade look darker, or expose for the shade and make the direct sunlit areas brighter. There are no requirements for exposure. Shoot some tests and see what you like.
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