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Sony DSR500


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#1 Daniel Smith

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 10:12 AM

Hi.

On the sides of cameras like the Sony 500 and 570 there is a BNC video out connection, I was wondering what bit rate they run at? Are they compressed 25mbits or are they SDI?

The other question was how long can you run BNC cables before they start losing signal?

Thanks.
Daniel.
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 10:55 AM

The BNC out on the DSR-500 is composite analogue.

BNC video cables are designed to go a very long way - it's unlikely you'll hit theoretical limits before you hit practical limits. SDI and especially HD-SDI is less robust than composite.

P
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#3 Daniel Smith

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 11:05 AM

Ok thanks.

How do you think the analogue composite measures in terms of bits? We have a dvcpro 100 deck and I wondered if there was any advantage of plugging it into that as opposed to a 25 mbit DVCAM deck.

cheers.
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#4 David Auner aac

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 11:09 AM

How do you think the analogue composite measures in terms of bits? We have a dvcpro 100 deck and I wondered if there was any advantage of plugging it into that as opposed to a 25 mbit DVCAM deck.


Don't do it. You'll record a really awful signal if you do. Composite is around 250 lines resolution and color and luma are sent on a single wire (hence the name). In other words, Composite is around the quality of VHS! DVCAM is way better!

Cheers, Dave
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#5 Daniel Smith

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 05:39 PM

Ok thanks.


A very random question (I didn't think it was worth creating a whole new thread), what correction gels do you apply to mix both daylight and tungsten? ie. if I was to shoot an indoor scene which also contained bright windows etc. what would I need to balance out the indoor tungsten lights, half CTB?

cheers.
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#6 Serge Teulon

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 06:41 PM

A very random question (I didn't think it was worth creating a whole new thread), what correction gels do you apply to mix both daylight and tungsten? ie. if I was to shoot an indoor scene which also contained bright windows etc. what would I need to balance out the indoor tungsten lights, half CTB?


On a digital camera the optimum balance setting for mixed lighting without a WB is the preset of 4300k.....it splits the difference. So you will get daylight as sightly blue and tungsten will render a slight orangeness.

Although daylight temperature changes throughout the day, 5600k is a safe place to work from. Full CTB will render you a colour temp of 5600k.

I, and many others I'm sure, use half ctb as an effect colour. For example if you are shooting with the camera or stock that is set at 3200 and you want a slight amount of blue/daylight temp you would use half rather than full.

I'm quite tired so hope it makes sense.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 07:37 PM

You would use Full CTB to correct tungsten to daylight. This cuts two stops of light, which is why small tungstens gelled for daylight are fairly useless, light output-wise, in many day situations, especially if you hope to soften them as well.

You can get away however with 1/2 CTB on a tungsten lamp if you don't mind a little warmth in a daylight situation.
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#8 David Auner aac

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 01:33 AM

On a digital camera the optimum balance setting for mixed lighting without a WB is the preset of 4300k.....it splits the difference. So you will get daylight as sightly blue and tungsten will render a slight orangeness.


Hi Daniel,

The DSR-500 series cameras only have 3200k and 5600k presets. So, you'd have to set the filter wheel to 3200k and WB the camera through one half CTB or light a piece of paper you'll WB off with a tungsten light corrected to 4300k. IMO that's the best way to do it, as gelling tungsten with full CTB really cuts your light as David said.
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#9 Daniel Smith

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 08:19 AM

On a digital camera the optimum balance setting for mixed lighting without a WB is the preset of 4300k.....it splits the difference. So you will get daylight as sightly blue and tungsten will render a slight orangeness.

Although daylight temperature changes throughout the day, 5600k is a safe place to work from. Full CTB will render you a colour temp of 5600k.

I, and many others I'm sure, use half ctb as an effect colour. For example if you are shooting with the camera or stock that is set at 3200 and you want a slight amount of blue/daylight temp you would use half rather than full.

I'm quite tired so hope it makes sense.


You would use Full CTB to correct tungsten to daylight. This cuts two stops of light, which is why small tungstens gelled for daylight are fairly useless, light output-wise, in many day situations, especially if you hope to soften them as well.

You can get away however with 1/2 CTB on a tungsten lamp if you don't mind a little warmth in a daylight situation.

Cheers guys, I don't want to completelly convert the indoor lamps to 5600, just enough so they produce a natural lamp glow like you would see in life, not overly warm like a daylight balanced camera would normally see them.


Hi Daniel,

The DSR-500 series cameras only have 3200k and 5600k presets. So, you'd have to set the filter wheel to 3200k and WB the camera through one half CTB or light a piece of paper you'll WB off with a tungsten light corrected to 4300k. IMO that's the best way to do it, as gelling tungsten with full CTB really cuts your light as David said.

I actually managed to get manual control of the WB a few days ago, the settng wheel can actually change it in increments of 100k.

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 10 July 2008 - 08:21 AM.

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