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types of cranes


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#1 pushpa

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 08:24 PM

hi to everyone who r reading this lines...

i had heard in the film industry about cranes like akila, jimmy jeep and a lot of others...
what do they mean and what are the differences between this cranes...and is there are some other type of cranes...please explain..

thank u...
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#2 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 11:41 PM

These are just different model names, like "Prius" or "Accord" for cars. Some are small, some are large, some are one piece, others are modular so they can be assembled to different lengths. Some can get longer and shorter at the touch of a button.

Edited by Jon Rosenbloom, 13 July 2008 - 11:41 PM.

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#3 Gus Sacks

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 09:11 PM

Jon, have you worked with the Fisher 23?
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#4 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 10:43 PM

Can't speak for Jon, but others here have, including myself.

-DW
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#5 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 11:10 PM

Yeah, I like the Fisher 23 quite a bit. It's a "crane in a box." The set-up is pretty easy, but you have to pay attention to which guy wire and posts go w/ the length you're building out to.
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#6 Gus Sacks

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 12:17 AM

Jon and Daniel :),

I'm looking to use it on a fairly well-budgeted student film in Upstate NY in late-August. The Key I use has yet to work with it, and the Grips we'll be bringing on haven't either. Nor will the Gaffer; I'm assuming (I say him bc I want to use the 23 as a Condor of sorts as well - I saw it's got pin adapters there).

How easy is it to learn during check-out? (we'll go to either CSC or Eastern for it - getting the Fisher 10 from elsewhere) and to get your feet with it on-set before it can become comfortable? I know how getting used to most gear can be, but considering the "customizable" nature of the crane lengths and balancing, etc, is it a liability to go on the job (5 day shoot) with grips unaccustomed to the gear beforehand?

Much appreciated.
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#7 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 12:57 AM

Gus,
It is relatively easy to set up. I have no idea of the experience level of your grips/key, but if they have any experience with jibs, it shouldn't be much of a problem. It is pretty basic. Parts are color-coded. The unit comes with pretty straight-forward instructions (at least, the one from Eastern Effects does; the CSC one should too).

To speed things up on set, and to make sure no one is waiting around for the grip department (a big blunder in my book), have them build it during the checkout (which is a good idea to do with ANYTHING, regardless, to make sure all pieces are there, and nothing is damaged, etc.). This way, the rental staff can help with any questions, and things will flow more smoothly on the day. This, really, is generally up to the key... but I don't know what your role is in this production.

I say him bc I want to use the 23 as a Condor of sorts as well

Hmm... this raises some flags... not sure what you mean by this, but I sure hope you don't plan on trying putting a person up there, or a nine-light or something. The Fisher 23 Jib is not a riding crane.

PS- I hope some of the money from this "well-budgeted student film" ends up going towards the crews day rates ;)


Cheers,
-DW
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#8 Gus Sacks

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 01:06 AM

Gus,
It is relatively easy to set up. I have no idea of the experience level of your grips/key, but if they have any experience with jibs, it shouldn't be much of a problem. It is pretty basic. Parts are color-coded. The unit comes with pretty straight-forward instructions (at least, the one from Eastern Effects does; the CSC one should too).

To speed things up on set, and to make sure no one is waiting around for the grip department (a big blunder in my book), have them build it during the checkout (which is a good idea to do with ANYTHING, regardless, to make sure all pieces are there, and nothing is damaged, etc.). This way, the rental staff can help with any questions, and things will flow more smoothly on the day. This, really, is generally up to the key... but I don't know what your role is in this production.


Hmm... this raises some flags... not sure what you mean by this, but I sure hope you don't plan on trying putting a person up there, or a nine-light or something. The Fisher 23 Jib is not a riding crane.

PS- I hope some of the money from this "well-budgeted student film" ends up going towards the crews day rates ;)


Cheers,
-DW



Oh, no. I meant possibly throwing a Mickey or something similar up there instead of building a menace arm or something as such.

Haha, yes, my Keys are getting paid fairly well on the project. No worries. The grips and electrics are film students and doing it for more experience - even though I've used them on past projects and certainly trust them with working under my Key Grip and Gaffer.

I'm DPing the project, but will probably stop in at the check-out to get a look at the 23 before we're on-set so I can get a better idea of the height increments.

I knew about the color-coding, but I'm glad it seems pretty cut and dry.

Thanks much.
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#9 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 01:39 AM

Bring your boys with you to prep it. If you have more then a week for them to go everyday until they learn it inside out, you should be more than fine. Most mechanical equipment isn't hard to work, it just takes love and time. A lot of more experienced guys will teach you what to do and what not do to, and also proper care and maintenance. They will also teach you what is safe and what isn't; which is very important.
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#10 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 01:48 AM

It's tough to say what the learning curve is. The times I've put it together I'm usually one of 10 grips and they' send me off w/ another guy and we mess around for a while until we figured it out. Just remember that once you start in on a chosen length, it's going to be very time consuming to change your mind. Are you putting a hot head on it? Also, you might call someone like Movie Mobile, and they'll send you a Giraffe crane w/ a tech who will put it together.
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#11 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:44 AM

I've used the 23 on a lot of features. It's a great arm. It's very intuitive and everything is color coded. If you can read and you have a basic knowledge of cranes you can do it. The caveat here is if someone you are working with or yourself is familiar with basic crane ettiquette, you can figure it out. The hardest thing about the 23 is that you have to keep the arm level to get all the pieces to fit. It's the easiest arm to build I have come across in years. Look for the "rear" piece, the "third" piece which are all marked, and if you have a grip crew who know how to operate cranes safely you will be fine.
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#12 Gus Sacks

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 01:26 PM

Just remember that once you start in on a chosen length, it's going to be very time consuming to change your mind. Are you putting a hot head on it? Also, you might call someone like Movie Mobile, and they'll send you a Giraffe crane w/ a tech who will put it together.


Good advice, Jon. We're not putting a hot head; just a 2-axis Weaver. We're using this mostly for boom up/downs with the dolly and locked off shots either looking to the distance or straight down (director's got some interesting stuff in mind). I don't think we can afford a Giraffe and a tech. At least for the run of the shoot.

The hardest thing about the 23 is that you have to keep the arm level to get all the pieces to fit. It's the easiest arm to build I have come across in years. Look for the "rear" piece, the "third" piece which are all marked, and if you have a grip crew who know how to operate cranes safely you will be fine.


Okay. I'm going to get in touch with my Key today to see if he can maybe stop in a few times to check the guy out before the check-out. He works freelance in a house in the city so maybe he can use that as somewhat of a cover, hah.

How easy is it to keep the crane itself level for shots? Could you use a c-stand or so to rest it on like some Jimmy Jibs I've seen? Or does it have to be held in place. Or should it be?

By the way, Darryl, been an avid reader of your blog for a while! Even though I don't grip it's really interesting to read.
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#13 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 01:40 PM

If you're using it for position static shots, just grab it w/ a cardellini and a c-stand.

As for leveling, I think the plate at the bottom has a four way leveler, but w/ the camera and weighted arm it will take some muscle. Try to keep the dolly level.

If you need skateboard wheels, pm me.

Now, please answer my question in the hvx forum! :)
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#14 Gus Sacks

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:17 PM

If you're using it for position static shots, just grab it w/ a cardellini and a c-stand.

As for leveling, I think the plate at the bottom has a four way leveler, but w/ the camera and weighted arm it will take some muscle. Try to keep the dolly level.

If you need skateboard wheels, pm me.

Now, please answer my question in the hvx forum! :)


I answered as best I could!

You just have a set of wheels chillin?
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#15 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 03:18 PM

"You just have a set of wheels chillin?"

Yeah. I also have a platform with a push bar that fits into them. I used that set-up fro every dolly move on my reel.
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#16 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 04:36 PM

[How easy is it to keep the crane itself level for shots? Could you use a c-stand or so to rest it on like some Jimmy Jibs I've seen? Or does it have to be held in place. Or should it be?

By the way, Darryl, been an avid reader of your blog for a while! Even though I don't grip it's really interesting to read.
[/quote]

Jon answered. Thanks, I'm glad you enjoy it!
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#17 Gus Sacks

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 12:32 AM

Eastern got rid of their 23! :huh:

Is CSC my only alternative?
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#18 Warwick Hempleman

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 09:37 AM

Eastern got rid of their 23! :huh:

Is CSC my only alternative?



Gus,

At present, yes, CSC is the only place in NY with the 23.
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rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Glidecam

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport