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#1 Will Huckle

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 10:01 AM

I'm doing some research into changes in technology surrounding
cinematography and the effect this has on
cinematographers... for example, changes in the roles/powers of the
cinematographer due to tech changes in the digital intermediate,
colourists, timers, pre-vis artists etc..

What are the most significant changes people are experiencing?

How does everybody feel about these and other changes? Are they
helpful? To whom? The cinematographer? The
studios/producers/financiers? Are they to be embraced or contended? Is
the cinematographers role changing?

I'm coming to the end of film school at Bristol University, UK, hoping
to go into cinematography, and currently involved in this interesting
and relevant study. If anybody has had any experiences around this
area then it would help me enormously. I do hope that its quite a
contentious topic and would love to get some debate going.

All the best,

Will Huckle
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 11:56 AM

This is called the quiet before the storm... get ready Will!
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 12:10 PM

Well, technology has now allowed cinematographers to more efficiently... get questions from film students writing papers. The days of a written letter or phone interview are passing us by.

The most common change has been towards the greater use of digital intermediates for features in just the past two years... but the most dramatic change, which is only now beginning to happen, is the greater use of digital cameras instead of film cameras.

On the other hand, the fundamentals of daily lighting & shooting haven't really changed that much.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 12:11 PM

The huge store of information available via smart phones and the Internet. I can get all sorts of information easily without hauling it with me. For instance, I've got Panavision Australia's depth of field calculator bookmarked on my Motorola Razr2 and if I want to know sunset/sunrise just about anywhere in the US, that information is about ten keystrokes away on a NOAA site.

And I can surf and post on cml-pro and Cinematography.com from my phone.
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#5 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 01:18 PM

I recall an anecdote, it may be apocryphal, but it still could be useful. As the story goes, when Hollywood made the switch to talkies, it was necessary to retrofit cameras with motors that could maintain sync with the recording apparatus. There was no longer a practical need for hand cranking, which was a major part of the duties of a cameraman. Because of this, one expert in the field suggested the days of the cinematographer were at an end, because why would there be a need when the director could simply switch on the camera himself?

We all know how that turned out!

Best,
BR
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 06:11 PM

This only slightly related... but my wife stumbled across this article from "Camera" magazine in 1923:

PICTURE THEATRES MAY VANISH IN TEN YEARS

It was an article about how ticket sales were down because the public wasn't being educated to learn that theaters had improved since the nickelodeon days, and how big productions like "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" were being made at great cost to draw people back to the theaters.
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#7 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 07:25 PM

This only slightly related... but my wife stumbled across this article from "Camera" magazine in 1923:

PICTURE THEATRES MAY VANISH IN TEN YEARS

It was an article about how ticket sales were down because the public wasn't being educated to learn that theaters had improved since the nickelodeon days, and how big productions like "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" were being made at great cost to draw people back to the theaters.


Well, I've always said movies have been going down hill since "The Messenger Boy's Mistake" took the nickel-odeons by storm. :)

BR
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Wooden Camera

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Ritter Battery

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Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

CineLab