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#1 Neema Sadeghi

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 08:21 PM

Okay, so I finally decided on a Nizo 801. It seemed to have the best features that I was looking for in a camera. Now I have a few issues that I would like to resolve before I start.

1.I travel, a lot. I'm currently in Spain, but I'm going to Washington D.C. I would be using my camera in the states. There is a place here in Barcelona that sells film and develops film at a reasonable price. I am thinking about buying film here in barcelona, and then developing when i return, but I'm worried that it will get ruined in the airport. Anyone developed film that has been through the airport jungle of xrays?

2. Other option is I buy film (I was thinking from ebay) and getting it sent to me in the states, and I could get it developed in NYC and then travel back (if anyone suggests a place in nyc that would be great. I found A1 Film Labs has anyone tried them?)

3. I am a photographer, and I was wondering if I could just use the lightmeter in my camera to gauge the lighting necessary for the camera, do people use this method? or is this not really important?

And lastly, I would like to shoot either on 64t and/or Tri-X reversal black and white, how much time can I shoot on either?

I've read tons about super 8 and i think i'm finally ready to make the jump in. I study video graphics, but I think its important to learn the essentials.

Thanks.

Edited by Neema Sadeghi, 13 July 2008 - 08:24 PM.

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#2 Neema Sadeghi

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 08:25 PM

Sorry for the multiple messages, my browser was acting crazy.If a moderator can delete them that would be great.
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#3 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 07:32 AM

Buying Super 8 stuff in Spain is very very expensive. I suggest to avoid Spanish shops and buying via Internet which is about half the money. That's what I do.
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#4 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 07:58 AM

- A clean-up of your multiple thread-startings will be underway soon.

- For all information on Xray-travelling, please visit the FAQ on this site, specifically this post here.

- When you ask about "how much time can you shoot" on E-64 or Tri-X, do you mean the length of the filming, like in minutes? If you mean that, then a) I would suggest some more reading on how cine-film and Super 8 works - plenty of hyperlinks in the FAQ. Unlike video, you are shooting not at a constant speed of tape (SP / LP, if you want), but at different filming speeds. Normally this is 24 fps or 25 fps, esp. if you want to do a video post-chain (which I assume you will be doing). At 24 fps, a Super 8 cartridge of 50 ft / 15m (length supplied by Kodak, third party film stock by Wittner, Pro8mm, Velvia etc is usually 40 ft / 12m) will last pretty much exactly 2 minutes 30 sec.
You can also shoot at 18 fps (was the home movie filming speed during the amateur heydays of the format) which will give you 3min 20sec. But some telecine houses might not accept 18fps-shot film - check ahead.

- external lightmetering is standard practice in cinematography, but many cameras in the 16 format and all super 8 cameras have TTL lightmeters often of excellent quality (Gossen for Nizo 8-series). They are tuned-in to the interplay of filming speed, daylight filter, variable shutter and iris motorisation and I personally prefer to work with them rather than carry an external spotmeter or incident meter around if not necessary (ie. I shoot with practicals or natural on location, and don't have a complex stage lighting set-up at hand etc).
For me, this is one of those luxuries that Super 8 offers, and I even shifted to Super 16 cameras that have built-in TTLs (eclair, early Arri, early Aaton, Bolex 16 Pro etc) because of the convenience, and if you have an eye or feel for the f-stop by looking at your scene and into the shadows and at the sun, and know the film stock from experience, then you can roughly estimate the f-stop anyhow. If your Nizo 801 is checked and works fine, and if you don't have a lightmeter with you normally, then there's no reason not to trust the internal cell. Beware that you need batteries for the lightmeter in your Nizo 801 (see the manual for details)

-ML
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