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SD into HD (vertical orientation)


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#1 Giovanni Lampitz

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 02:47 AM

Hi all,
I'm currently working on a video dance project. Main characters of the action are the three dancers and the space, a very tall entrance to a yard. Therefore we dicided to shoot with the camera (canon xm2) in vertical orientation, what in still photography is also called portrait orientation. I think it is an estetically sensfull choice. With some technical problem to solve. On the set (we're mostly rehearsing right now) it's quite a lot of fun and, with the camera lcd screen, it's not that complicated. But I'm already thinking of the postproduction and how to deal with these images.
My plan is to open a HD (720p 25fps) project on FCP (or Premiere) import my DV images, turn them 90° and use the 720 orizzontal line of the DVpal as the 720 vertical line of the HD, avoiding croping , shrinking and losses of definition. Does it make any kind of sense? Would it be flawless as in my words or would it be a lot of problems? should I instead shoot in a orizontal orientation and then just crop it out? Any other suggestion?
Thanks in advanced for your help.

G.L.
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#2 Phil Connolly

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 01:47 PM

My plan is to open a HD (720p 25fps) project on FCP (or Premiere) import my DV images, turn them 90° and use the 720 orizzontal line of the DVpal as the 720 vertical line of the HD, avoiding croping , shrinking and losses of definition. Does it make any kind of sense? Would it be flawless as in my words or would it be a lot of problems? should I instead shoot in a orizontal orientation and then just crop it out? Any other suggestion?
Thanks in advanced for your help.

G.L.

Hello

A 90 degree flip is really easy to do in FCP.


I assuming you want to end up with a 3:4 image pillorboxed in a 16:9 HD frame. I'm assuming you shot 4:3 originally, but you could do the same with 16:9 material - for a more pronounced portrait effect.

Your right, there would be no cropping but you would have to do a slight re-size as HD has square pixels and SD has non-square pixels. So even if you have your 720 pixels lined up perfectly with no re-sizing on the vertical axis - in the horizontal axis you would have to a slight re-size as the pixels are a different shape.

In a 720p HD square pixel project a 3:4 vertical image (I'm assuming you shot 4:3 and rotate to get 3:4) would be 720 pixels high and 540 pixels across if my maths is right, NOT 480 or 576 you would get from shooting standard DV in PAL or NTSC. So if you shot NTSC you would have to do a slight stretch to get from 480 to 540. If you shot PAL you would squeeze the image slightly

So it won't be perfect - but its easy to do and would work better in PAL than NTSC.

The other option is just edit your footage in SD and when you screen it mount the projector or monitor on their side, not great for DVD's you send out - but if your doing an installation etc....

Hope I've made sense
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#3 Giovanni Lampitz

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 06:46 AM

Thanks man,
you actually made a lot of sense!!!
Ciao
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#4 Igor Ridanovic

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 06:41 PM

.


I assuming you want to end up with a 3:4 image pillorboxed in a 16:9 HD frame.


Why not finish it as 9:16 project that utilizes the full raster of the HD video? Video artists have been doing this for ages. Even before 16:9 Brian Eno made videos in vertical 3:4 format. Today it's even easier to rotate a flat screen monitor for exhibition purposes.

And it is very easy to make 3:4 image pillarboxed for those people who can't or won't rotate their display.

Edited by Igor Ridanovic, 08 August 2008 - 06:42 PM.

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